A shared Vision for East Allegheny July 1, 2007


Goals, Objectives, and Action Steps



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Goals, Objectives, and Action Steps

The following goals, objectives, and action step reference the “findings of fact” number that are most closely addressed by or form the basis of a particular goal, objective, or action step. The majority of findings, however, simply provide a basis or direction for economic activities and those types of businesses to be encouraged, maintained, or retained.


Goal 1: Minimize the amount and risk of commercial blight within the planning area through the reuse and revitalization of existing structures and vacant lots and preserving the stability of traditional and existing commercial cores and corridors. (VI, VII)
Objective 1: Adopt local land use ordinances that encourage the reuse and revitalization of existing structures and vacant lots and preserve the stability of existing commercial neighborhoods.


    • Action Step 1: Adopt zoning ordinance that includes the following elements:

      • Includes provisions for mixed use development, both as a tool for the development of those neighborhoods transitioning into multi-family and commercial uses and as a tool that encourages new development of a sustainable nature accommodating office, retail, residential, and low impact manufacturing.

      • Provides for Traditional Neighborhood Development in existing commercial cores.


    • Action Step 2: Adopt a subdivision ordinance that contains land development standards for commercial developments. Such standards may include sidewalks, landscaping, lighting, vehicular ingress and egress, and parking. These standards should clearly address additions and improvements to existing developments as well as new developments to the extent permissible by the Municipalities Planning Code.




  • Objective 2: Provide for tax incentives that encourage the improvement of currently deteriorated commercial properties and properties within blighted areas.




    • Action Step 1: Each community within the planning area should designate blighted or “deteriorating” areas by resolution in a manner consistent with Pennsylvania's Urban Redevelopment Law (Public Law 991). Standards such as high vacancy rates, high rental tenure of residential structures, and age of structures may be considered as outlined in this section.



  • Objective 3: Eliminate deteriorated commercial and residential structures in commercial areas deemed unsafe, irreparable, or unlikely to be sold or demolished by the owner.




    • Action Step 1: Direct an engineer to assess those residential properties, within the planning area, most in need of demolition and rank said properties.




    • Action Step 2: Apply for Allegheny County CDBG funding for demolition activity and demolish such structures.



  • Objective 4: Maintain or improve enforcement of property maintenance provisions.




    • Action Step 1: Each municipality within the planning area should adopt the most recent version of the International Property Maintenance Code.




    • Action Step 2: The three communities should jointly apply for funding through the Shared Municipal Services Program offered by DCED for a shared code enforcement initiative based on a cooperative agreement addressing the following:

      • Evaluate and rank property maintenance and building code violations with an emphasis on violations that directly impact more than one municipality.

      • Prosecute and seek remedy for such violations.

      • Establish a protocol for regular inspections upon change of occupancy.

      • Establish methods outlining the financial sustenance of such a program through the necessary adjustment of occupancy fees and the collection of fines from violators.




    • Action Step 3: Ensure the proper maintenance and safety of existing commercial units through the continued issuance of occupancy permits upon change of occupancy in conjunction with related inspections.



  • Objective 5: Promote the revitalization of infrastructure in existing nodes of commercial activity, including the business districts of East McKeesport and Wall, and existing retail centers of North Versailles.




    • Action Step 1: Conduct a survey and follow the steps outlined in the Housing Plan for the creation of Neighborhood Improvement Districts, to include the component of Business Improvement Districts.




    • Action Step 2: Designate Business Improvement District components of Neighborhood Improvement Districts cited in the Housing Plan.




    • Action Step 3: East McKeesport and Wall Borough should jointly apply for funding through PennDot’s Hometown Streets Program for improvements noted, in part, in the Transportation Plan, as well as street trees, bicycle or walking trails connecting commercial areas (as cited in the recreation section), uniform lighting, and other amenities. Municipal labor and engineering design costs may be used toward the required 20% match. The focus of such activities in East McKeesport should include Route 30 and proximate blocks of Broadway and Fifth Avenue. Wall Borough activities should include those blocks of Wall Avenue zoned for Mixed Use.




    • Action Step 4: Work in conjunction with the local business association and local businesses to encourage and provide avenues for tax credits under the Neighborhood Assistance Program for programs approved by the Center for Community Building. Neighborhood Improvement District Management Associations in conjunction with other non-profit entities may act to develop and gain approval for such programs that may include improvements of infrastructure, educational programs, and job creation.


Goal 2: Promote the location of new commercial centers of a mixed-use nature in the appropriate areas. (I,II,III)


  • Objective 1: Promote the location of new commercial centers in areas immediately accessible to major arterials and interchanges thereto; properly buffered from adjacent residential development; and where appropriate, integrated into abutting commercial developments. (VIII,




    • Action Step 1: Adopt a joint zoning ordinance including provisions for mixed use and large-scale commercial development as a conditional use per a planned district. Senior care facilities of various scales and types should be permitted as conditional uses and in conjunction with mixed-use districts, Planned Residential Development, and Traditional Neighborhood Development.




    • Action Step 2: Adopt a joint subdivision and land development ordinance that addresses issues of access to major corridors, pedestrian amenities, and other issues of site design.


Long Term Economic Development Goals: Long-term strategies may include the adaptive re-use of existing municipal buildings, namely those utilized by Wall and East McKeesport, as small business incubators. Long term funding and sustenance of Business and Neighborhood Improvement Districts will be key to the maintenance of infrastructure cited in the above-mentioned projects. Lastly, educational and infrastructure programs provided through local businesses and the Neighborhood Assistance Program, will provide a complementary approach to the improvement and maintenance of streetscape amenities, as provided by NID’s and associated programs. Goals, Objectives, and Action Steps



Goal

Objective

Action Step

Timeline

Funding Source

Estimated Costs

Responsible Parties

1

1

1

2007

LUPTAP, LGA, Local

$ 20,000.00

JPC







2

2007

LUPTAP, LGA, Local

$ 12,000.00

JPC




2

1

2007







JPC, ME, LGB




3

1

2007

Local



ME







2

2007 and ongoing

CDBG




ME




4

1

2007







LGB







2

2007

Shared Municipal Services, Local

$ 15,000.00

LGB with NVT as lead.







3

2007 - ongoing

Local




LGB




5

1

2007

Duquesne Light, Heinz Foundation

$10,000-$15,000
JPC, LA







2

2007







JPC, LA







3

2007

Hometown Streets Program

$50,000 - $70,000

NVT, Admin







4

2008- Long term.

Private

Variable

JPC, LGB, ME

2

1

1

2007

Refer to Goal 1.


JPC







2

2007

Refer to Goal 1.




JPC

Long Term







2010-2015










LGB= Local Governing Body

JPC = Joint Municipal Planning Commission

LA = Local Administration (Municipal Secretary and appointed staff)

ME = Municipal Engineer

NVT = North Versailles Township (Administration and Board of Commissioners)

Transportation Plan

Introduction

The Municipalities Planning Code requires the following regarding transportation planning in comprehensive plans:


“A plan for movement of people and goods, which may include expressways, highways, local street systems, parking facilities, pedestrian and bikeway systems, public transit routes, terminals, airfields, port facilities, railroad facilities and other similar facilities or uses.”
Therefore, this plan will address current and proposed road infrastructure within the planning area. The infrastructure shall include State, County, and locally owned and maintained streets. The most outstanding proposed transportation improvement in the area is the extension of the Mon-Fayette Expressway. The Expressway, as planned, will include an interchange in North Versailles with the Tri-Boro Expressway (SR 130). The plan will also address public transit and pedestrian circulation within the three communities.

Vision Statement

Transportation in the Planning Area will encompass the efficient movement of highway traffic along major arterials with limited curb-cuts; and the accommodation of bicycle and safe pedestrian movements throughout residential, public, and commercial nodes. New or improved street networks will include pedestrian elements where the scale is appropriate and will encourage traffic calming measures, especially in mixed use, residential, and retail developments.




Current Street Network




Table 1: Length of Roads





Length of Roads by Jurisdiction (Miles)

Community

State Roads

County Roads

Local Roads

East McKeesport

0.8

1.5

12

North Versailles

17.8

4.5

57.7

Wall

0.3

1.8

4.8

The greatest majority of streets within East McKeesport Borough (84%) are local streets while 72% and 70%, respectively, of North Versailles’ and Wall’s streets are locally owned and maintained.


Local streets in Wall are often dead-end streets, where a majority of original rights-of-way were left undeveloped due to poor topography. Particularly, alleyways, while speculatively planned, were never developed and remain as “paper streets.” Street rights-of-way average around 30 feet with cartways averaging 18 to 20 feet. The main corridor of Wall Avenue is owned and maintained by Allegheny County.
East McKeesport Borough’s street network represents a traditional manor of development with a grid street network and property access supported by maintained alleys. Average right-of-way width is 40 feet (20 feet in alleyways). Average cartway width varies between 20 to 22 feet (12 feet in alleyways). Routes 148 and 30 represent the only state-maintained street networks within East McKeesport. Fifth and Park Avenues are owned and maintained by Allegheny County.
Nearly one third of North Versailles’ street network is either State or County owned and maintained, including several north-south secondary arterials. Character of roadways varies. Traditional neighborhoods such as Dixon Hollow, Crestas Terrace, West Wilmerding and the areas nearest East McKeesport possess a street network and cartway characteristics similar to that of East McKeesport. More recent and post-World War II development within the Township such as the Sunset area includes wider cartways 24 to 26 feet, of a more suburban character.
The map below illustrates the type of functional class of State maintained roads within the planning area. County maintained roads are also shown. The majority of these roads are at least minor arterials, meaning they are eligible for federal funding.

Map 1: Functional Class




Large Scale projects listed on the Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission’s Long Range Transportation Plan include:


    1. Extension of the Tri-Boro Expressway to Route 48. This project is shown as “new capacity” or including the construction of new roads.

    2. Maintenance and widening of Route 48 from 130 to SR 30 is also shown as a project.

    3. Capital maintenance of the existing Tri-Boro Expressway is also denoted.

All three projects are slated for the third stage of the Plan, years 2015 – 2030.


The current Transportation Improvement Plan includes 2.3 million dollars programmed for the replacement of the Greensburg Pike Bridge.
The preceding projects take on added significance when the Turnpike Commission’s plans for the Mon-Fayette Expressway extension are considered. The current schedule may allow for the construction of this road within the next eight years. The following illustration, taken from the Commissions Environmental Impact Statement as prepared by Mackin Engineers shows the planned area of an interchange, which will require right-of-way in North Versailles. This exit would direct traffic onto the Tri-Boro Expressway. Project purposes stated within the final environmental impact statement include the reduction of crashes and improvement of roadway capacity “by drawing traffic onto a modern transportation facility.”

Source: Mackin Engineers, Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission.

Local Street Network
Glenn Engineering, engineer to the Township and Boroughs, has provided the following inventory of streets in need of reconstruction:
East McKeesport


  • Broadway Avenue from Route 30 to Josephine Street.

  • Park Street from Route 30 to Fifth Avenue

North Versailles




  • Delaware Avenue

  • Arlene Drive

  • Thompson Street

  • Montgomery Avenue

  • Halket Street

  • Peach Way

  • Highwood Road

  • Leuhm Avenue

  • Ondo Alley

  • Versailles Avenue

  • Lynda Lane

  • Woodland Road

  • Barry Street

  • Cross Street

  • Paris Street

  • Port Perry Road

  • Cedarhurst Road

Wall Borough




  • Patterson Avenue

  • Grant Street

  • Valley Avenue

  • Ross Street Extension

  • Bellview Street

The planning area contains several key corridors along which lie both intensive commercial developments, as well as dense residential neighborhoods the majority of which lie along north-south connectors such as East Pittsburgh McKeesport Boulevard. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation utilizing the Transportation Research Board’s Access Management Manual has developed model ordinances outlining standards for the minimization of conflict, in part through a reduction in curb cuts along roadways. Such standards may apply well to development and redevelopment of areas along these key corridors.




Sidewalks
East McKeesport and Wall possess the majority of sidewalks throughout both their business and single-family districts. In many cases, these corridors are in poor or deteriorating condition and will require large-scale replacement. Glenn Engineering, in conversation with the Township and Boroughs, has provided the following recommendations in terms of sidewalks:


  1. Wall Borough- Existing sidewalks in need of replacement:

    1. Wall Avenue

    2. Hampton Street

    3. Dalzell Street

    4. Negley Street

    5. Spring Hill Bridge Approach Ramp




  1. East McKeesport Borough

    1. Broadway Avenue in need of replacement.

    2. Fifth Avenue (Park to Woodmont), sidewalks need installed.

    3. Woodmont Avenue – 5th Avenue to Josephine Street, sidewalks need installed.




  1. North Versailles, Route 30

    1. Installation is recommended from Westinghouse Bridge to the East McKeesport line at Hilda Street, due to increased pedestrian traffic associated with the Walmart and associated retail businesses.

    2. Installation is recommended from Third Street to Route 48 due to the usage of students walking to and from school activities.


Parking
While parking in North Versailles is typically a function of suburban commercial/retail development, parking in the Boroughs is often limited to on-street parking for businesses which often conflicts with residential parking, where many single-family structures do not enjoy off-street parking facilities.
Rail Activity
Two rail lines traverse North Versailles, along both the Monongahela River and Turtle Creek, where an intermodal terminal is accessed just off of Wall Avenue, directly abutting Wall Borough and Turtle Creek. The Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission is completing a study of commuter rail both the Monongahela and Allegheny River corridors to the east of Pittsburgh. The Monongahela rail line would follow Turtle Creek and include a terminal at nearby Trafford Borough. The proximity of such transportation may provide increased residential redevelopment opportunities near the future terminal.
The intermodal terminal, located in North Versailles Township, is the focus of activity often posing a nuisance to neighboring Wall Borough in terms of noise and ancillary uses such as storage of rail cars, materials, and parking. Borough officials have expressed an interest in developing a recreational facility for viewing the operations at the intermodal facility, as visitors often travel to the Borough to observe the facility. Zoning regulating further expansion of the stated ancillary uses will also aid in promoting the facility as an asset while reducing it negative effects.

Public Transit
The Port Authority serves all three communities. Wall Borough includes bus stops along Wall Avenue, East McKeesport along Route 30, and North Versailles throughout the Township, including several park and ride lots.

Findings of Fact


  1. The planned interchange with the Mon-Fayette Expressway may result in reduced traffic along main corridors, increased north-south connectivity, and associated economic, residential development and revitalization opportunities.




  1. Commuter rail may provides benefits similar to those cited under item I, namely in regards to residential revitalization and local retail services.




  1. Pedestrian infrastructure in the form of sidewalks within the Boroughs is in need of repair and maintenance.




  1. New sidewalks are needed in key corridors, namely within North Versailles and East McKeesport, in order to promote safer pedestrian movements and encourage the sustenance of localized retail services and specialties.




  1. Numerous streets within the planning area are in need of reconstruction.




  1. Access management concepts as defined in this chapter may increase the safety and efficiency of existing roadways while decreasing maintenance and improvements costs.




  1. The Inter-Modal rail facility may be promoted as an asset to the planning area in a manner that reduces nuisance impacts to its neighbors.




  1. Centralized public parking areas are needed within the Boroughs to promote and support small office, retail, and personal service establishments.


Goal 1: Appropriately address the anticipated impacts of planned and existing transportation improvements. (I,II,VIII)


  • Objective 1: Adopt Official Map reserving areas for needed right of way expansions throughout the planning area.




    • Action Step 1: Develop assumptions of future land uses, namely planned development and redevelopment areas.

    • Action Step 2: Conduct traffic study utilizing accepted methods in order to determine needed right-of-way expansions and areas currently deficient, namely in regards to site distance and level of service in general.

    • Action Step 3: With the assistance of the Borough and Township Engineer, delineate necessary right of way and right of way expansions and parcels intended as public parking facilities on an Official Map.




  • Objective 2: Utilize traffic studies, provided by developer, to determine necessary on-site improvements, ingress and egress, and circulation within new developments.




    • Action Step 1: Include transportation impact study requirements in subdivision ordinance.




  • Objective 3: Beautify and minimize the effects of the Intermodal facility while capitalizing on its presence as an asset to the planning area.




    • Action Step 1: Seek Transportation Enhancement funding for a viewing dock of the Intermodal facility with accompanying historical information on Wall Borough and its rail history as well as parking and necessary pedestrian linkages.




    • Action Step 2: Consider related use issues in drafting of joint zoning ordinance.


Goal 2: Rebuild and redevelop existing infrastructure corridors to promote safety, economic development, and neighborhood revitalization.


  • Objective 1: Promote safer walkable environments




    • Action Step 1: Apply for Safe Routes to School Program Funding for sidewalks along Route 30 as specified in this chapter.

    • Action Step 2: Include sidewalk development in downtown revitalization requests.

    • Action Step 3: Request funding for sidewalk installation along with CDBG requests for street reconstruction, where applicable.

    • Action Step 4: Require sidewalk installation in new land developments and subdivisions.




  • Objective 2: Rebuild existing streets in need of reconstruction.




    • Action Step 1: Consistently apply for and utilize CDBG funding for streets in lower to moderate-income areas.

    • Action Step 2: Prioritize streets in need of repair, namely those on or near the borders of municipalities within the planning area, considering the availability of budgeted of local funding.



Goal

Objective

Action Step

Timeline

Funding Source

Estimated Costs

Responsible Parties

1

1

1

2007

Local


ME, LGB







2

2007

Local

$ 12,000.00

ME, LGB, JPT






3

2007

Local

$5,000.00

ME, LGB, JPT, LPC




2

1

2008

Local

$2,000

JPT, ME




3

1

2011

Enhancements/Local

TBD

Wall, ME







2

2007

State, Private

Included in grant

JPT

2

1

1

2007

PennDot

TBD
JPT, ME







2

2007

CDBG

TBD

JPT, ME, LGB







3

2007 and ongoing.

CDBG

TBD
LGB, ME







4

2007

State, Private

TBD
JPT




2

1

2007 and ongoing.

CDBG

TBD
LGB







2

2007 and ongoing

CDBG

TBD

LGB

LGB= Local Governing Body

JPC = Joint Municipal Planning Commission

LA = Local Administration (Municipal Secretary and appointed staff)

LPC = Local Planning Commissions

ME = Municipal Engineer

TBD = To be determined.

Wall = Wall Borough Council



Conservation Plan




Vision Statement

The planning area will recognize natural infrastructure, namely wooded hillsides and steep slopes, in conjunction with man-made infrastructure such that these important features become an integrated and perpetual part of future developments and the community as a whole.



Introduction

The Municipalities Planning Code recognizes the importance of resource conservation in its requirement that comprehensive plans address the following:


A plan for the protection of natural and historic resources to the extent not preempted by federal or state law. This clause includes, but is not limited to, wetlands and aquifer recharge zones, woodlands, steep slopes, prime agricultural land, flood plains, unique natural areas and historic sites.”
Therefore, this chapter and plan will examine the key areas of conservation within the planning area. In particular, the chapter will concentrate on wooded hillsides and steep slope as existing resources in need of conservation.

Map 1: Steep Slopes, Wooded Areas, and Floodplains




Source: Southwestern PA Commission GIS
As evident on the above map, existing woodlands and steep slopes, slopes of 25% or greater typically coincide with one another. Therefore, protection of steep slopes through grading ordinances, zoning overlay districts and lower densities, and subdivision design standards will aid in the conservation of wooded areas. Generally, slopes ranging from 25 to 40% require geo-technical studies, additional standards, and lower densities, while developments on slope greater than 40% is typically restricted. The table below illustrates the large amount of slopes, both moderate and

Steep, within the planning area. One third of land area lies within steep slopes, those 25% or greater, while another fifth of the land area lies within a moderate range of 15 to 25%.


Table 1: Slope in the Planning Area





Slope

Percent

0-8%

37%

>8-15%

10%

>15-25%

23%

>25-40%

22%

>40%

8%

While the MPC states that forestry shall be a permitted use within every zoning district, the definition of forestry only includes that which conforms to accepted “silvicultural principles.” This important clause affirms the right and responsibility of the Township and Boroughs to require the submission of erosion and sedimentation and other relevant plans, require standards defining proper principles and practices, and require proper permitting. Also, through Planned Residential Development and Subdivision and Land Development standards, the municipalities could encourage the preservation of healthy existing woodlands as well as the replanting or re-vegetation of open space areas, namely steep slopes.


The institution of best management practices relating to steep slopes, woodlands conservation, and erosion and sedimentation control will greatly aid in the protection of local watersheds. The northern portion of the planning area, namely Route 30 northward, lies within the Turtle Creek Watershed, with the southern area split between several watersheds, namely the Jacks Run and Crooked Run Watershed Basins.
The majority of floodplains within the planning area lie at the base of steep slopes. Therefore, the protection of these areas, along with existing floodplain standards, helps to protect these areas.
Lastly, local ordinances must take into account the presence of slide prone soils, namely redbeds located in the area of Wall Borough. While these types of soils typically coincide with steep slopes, their presence in areas of moderate slope may also warrant additional standards and restrictions in order to prevent future landslides.
This plan also recognizes the historic resources and unique histories of each community as an important factor in conservation as well as the promotion and marketing of each community.

Recommendations


In conclusion, the municipalities within the planning area should:


  1. Adopt compatible grading and erosion and sedimentation ordinances that address issues of forestry and work in areas of steep slope, where disturbance is limited and discouraged;




  1. Encourage and require the preservation and reforestation of wooded hillsides in joint subdivision and zoning ordinances, in both residential and commercial developments;




  1. Adopt compatible standards for forestry within the confines of State law;




  1. And discourage or limit development in areas of steep slope through lower density zoning districts in conjunction with standards contained in grading ordinances.




  1. Incorporate model standards for protection of riparian buffers now set forth in the County’s subdivision ordinance within local ordinances.




  1. The Townships and Borough should conduct a study of historic resources seeking funding through the Pennsylvania Historic and Museum Commission. Such resources should be noted within Enhancement projects including beautification of the Intermodal Facility bordering Wall and trail connections between the communities. Such should also be recognized in any marketing plans developed as per related recommendations within this plan.

Timeline: 2007 -2011



Recreation Plan




Introduction


The Municipalities Planning Code, Section 301 (a), contemplates recreation planning within the context of a comprehensive plan, both as a land use type for which land within the area is allotted, and as a community facility. This section will evaluate recreation from these two standpoints.

Current Activities and Plans


North Versailles Township commissioned the development of a Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Plan completed in May of 2003 and developed by Environmental Planning and Design, LLC. The plan encourages cooperation between the School District and the Township. In fact, an intergovernmental cooperation agreement between the District and its member municipalities has since been executed in the spring of 2004. The agreement was executed as a requirement of a Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Grant to develop further joint projects and agreements, a first step to address concerns regarding the joint utilization of District facilities.

While East McKeesport and Wall are certainly stakeholders currently involved in cooperative efforts with the Township and School District, they were not a direct party to the 2003 plan. Therefore, Glenn Engineering has provided an assessment of parks within the Boroughs. The assessment is provided at the end of this chapter. It cites the respectable condition and recent improvements to actively maintained parks within the Boroughs. East McKeesport, in fact, received approximately $86,000 in CDBG for improvements to Chicora Street and Josephine Avenue playgrounds. The Tisonia Playground in East McKeesport will require updates to become handicap accessible and does not contain a safety surface or proper fall zones.

The report, however, notes two issues regarding existing ballfields. The School District owns an unutilized soccer/softball field on Pittsburgh Street. The Borough is attempting to convince the School District to lease the property to the Borough, allowing the Borough to pursue grant monies for improvements. Also, Wall Borough owns an unused ballfield at Pennsylvania and Hampton and has no plans to improve the facility.

The Comprehensive Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Plan recognizes the need for a comparatively larger community park. The plan recognizes an adequate number of local parks within the Township. Given the National Recreation and Parks Administration standards utilized in the plan, the Boroughs currently possess an adequate number of parks and recreational facilities. The community park is therefore the missing component within the planning area, coupled with the need for intergovernmental cooperation to ensure the continued availability and development of facilities owned by the School District and shared by the Boroughs and East Allegheny Athletic Association.

Lastly, North Versailles Township owns approximately 20 acres of land accessible from Signal Hill Road. Recent discussions between the three municipalities indicates a desire to develop the area as a community or regional park commensurate with recommendations of the adopted North Versailles Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Plan. All three municipalities have expressed interest in the joint development and usage of a facility. Legal access and the ability to improve an entrance to the property must be explored and investigated.

Public Input, East McKeesport and Wall

Key stakeholder questionnaires distributed within East McKeesport and Wall included recommendations relating to recreation. Key issues cited included the following:




  • The development of trail systems, including trails in unused rights-of-way. East McKeesport officials expressed an interest in the development of the unopened right-of-way associated with Morelle Avenue. This trail would link the business area with the residential areas in the northern part of the Borough, and with present or future recreational facilities. Additionally, Wall Borough may utilize unopened portions of streets accessing planned municipal open space and recreational land fronting on Valley Avenue.




  • The development of future recreational areas was also contemplated. East McKeesport has discussed recreational amenities and trail development along with similar development on the School District parcel. Wall has discussed a community facility with a pavilion and picnic area on land owned jointly by the Borough, School District, and County. This area may include a private recreational facility as well, as defined by the Borough’s zoning ordinance.


Findings of Fact





  1. The communities of the planning area possess increasing opportunities to cooperate and coordinate recreational activities, as is evidenced by the recent cooperative agreement.




  1. The planning area is in need of a community park in addition to the number of existing local parks and fields.




  1. Trails systems should be developed to enhance pedestrian and bike transportation, and to provide interconnections between new and existing developments and communities.




  1. Coordination with the School District, as the owner of certain facilities, and joint owner of vacant land in other cases, is an important factor in the future development of recreation.




  1. The clarification of ownership of abandoned rights-of-way, through condemnation, or other proceeding recommended by the respective solicitors of each municipality is also an important step in planning trail connections through these corridors.




  1. The property off of Signal Hill Road provides opportunity for the development of a joint park, as a regional facility to which fee-in-lieu monies from development throughout North Versailles may be allocable.


Goal 1: Provide for future parkland where necessary.


  • Objective 1: Secure funding and ownership of necessary land.




    • Action Step 1: Utilize Official Map to designate recreational areas. Such areas may include “paper” streets, certain parcels, and in the case of Wall Borough, parcels which the Borough owns jointly with the School District and County.




    • Action Step 2: Clarify ownership of abandoned rights-of-way, through condemnation, or other proceeding recommended by the respective solicitors of each municipality. Include findings in the evaluation of project feasibility and funding needs.




    • Action Step 3: Wall Borough should sell the parcels on which the current ballfield is located, utilizing the monies as seed money for the development of the park along Valley Avenue. The Borough will also seek a public/private partnership with a facility that may locate within or near the park, providing amenities such as food service.




    • Action Step 4: East McKeesport and Wall should seek planning funding through the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources’ Community Conservation Partnerships Program in order to evaluate proposed park expansion, identify niches for each community that may be shared between both, and evaluate funding options.




    • Action Step 5: North Versailles should explore accessibility to the parcel off of Signal Hill Road as well as funding necessary to develop basic amenities in the park such that fee-in-lieu dollars are allocable to the project.


Goal 2: Plan for long term sharing of facilities and coordinated planning of open space corridors and trails.


  • Objective 1: Update North Versailles Plan to include all three municipalities.




    • Action Step 1: Seek funding for the update of the plan to include findings of Action Step 4 under Goal 1, Objective 1. Such funding requests should be part of the same project contemplated under Action Step 4 and including key trail and greenway linkages between the communities.




    • Action Step 2: Update the Comprehensive Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Plan and related intergovernmental cooperative agreement accordingly.




Goal

Objective

Action Step

Timeline

Funding Source

Estimated Costs

Responsible Parties

1

1

1

2007

Local

$6,000
LPC, JPT, ME







2

2007

Local

TBD

LA






3

2007

Local




WALL







4

2007

Local, DCNR

Refer to 2,1,1

JPT, EMCK, WALL







5

2007

Local




NVT

2

1

1

2007

Local, DCNR

$20,000

JPT, LA, NVT







2

2008







JPT, LA, NVT

JPC = Joint Municipal Planning Commission

LA = Local Administration (Municipal Secretary and appointed staff)

LPC = Local Planning Commissions

ME = Municipal Engineer

NVT = North Versailles Township Board of Commissioners

TBD = To be determined

Wall = Wall Borough Council




Public Facilities Plan




Vision Statement

The municipalities of the Planning Area will provide municipal facilities in a cost-effective and safe manner, convenient to the residents and stakeholders of each respective municipality, and integrated with neighboring uses as well as pedestrian and vehicular linkages.


Introduction

The Municipalities Planning Code, Section 301(a), requires the following element within local comprehensive plans:


“A plan for community facilities and utilities, which may include public and private education, recreation, municipal buildings, fire and police stations, libraries, hospitals, water supply and distribution, sewerage and waste treatment, solid waste management, storm drainage, and flood plain management, utility corridors and associated facilities, and other similar facilities or uses.”
Recreational facilities are addressed elsewhere in this plan and as well as in North Versailles’ 2003 Comprehensive Park, Recreation, and Open Space Plan. Additionally, water supply and distribution are separately addressed within this plan. This plan or chapter, in particular, chooses to evaluate and plan for public municipal facilities, including municipal administration, police, fire stations, and libraries.

Assessment of Municipal Facilities

North Versailles Township


The following is an assessment of North Versailles Township

Municipal facilities, repairs or upgrades needed, and the costs associated.




Repair Needed
Roof is in need of replacement
Repair ceiling and wall cracks

Repoint bricks on parapet


Repair window in tax office
Seal openings in ceiling of garage below eastern wing

Replace loose stucco, west side


Replace mis-aligned sidewalk slabs, front
Resurface public works yard
Replace fence around public works yard
Police Department Expansion
Community Center Building 1401 Greensburg Avenue
Repair leaking roof
Seal openings in salt garage ceiling
Finish floor, walls and ceiling in record room.
Crestas Park

Tara Avenue
Replace roof shingles on rest rooms and shelter
West Wilmerding Park

Tintsman A venue
Replace roof on shelter.

$60,000
$2,000


$20,000
$1,000
$8,000
$7,500
$13,400
$45,000

$9,000
$172,000


$4,000
$16,000
$40,000

$3,000

$1,500
*Provided by Glenn Engineering, December of 2005



East McKeesport Borough

The current Borough Building, a former church, is located at Florence Avenue. The structure houses the Borough’s police department and administrative offices and meeting rooms. While the structure’s condition is average, the Borough notes extreme deficiencies in regards to parking. No room exists for parking or expansion of the structure to accommodate additional services currently housed elsewhere. The public works garage is located off of Melrose Avenue and is in need of upgrades that will necessitate a new structure in the long term.


The Borough also owns a structure on Chicora Street that houses its senior citizens center.

Wall Borough

Wall administrative offices and public works facilities housed within its Borough Building, a former school, at 413 Wall Avenue. Police services are contracted through East McKeesport Borough. The Borough utilizes only a portion of this two-story structure which is in need of extensive repairs.




Joint Municipal Complex Estimates

The following estimates were prepared by Glenn Engineering in regards to a joint municipal complex contemplated by East McKeesport and Wall to possible include Wilmerding. An option or variation of the estimates and items below may consider shared facilities in multiple locations where common functions take place in each municipality. Such shared facilities may include administrative space within North Versailles’ remodeled facilities.


Joint Municipal Complex

For East McKeesport. Wall and Wilmerding Boroughs
The proposed building is to house the municipal offices, tax office, police department and fire departments for the three boroughs. The building would include the following: Squad Room, Chief's Office, Locker Room, Evidence Room, Two Holding Cells. Municipal Offices: Three Secretary's Offices, Tax Office, Mayor's Office, Large Meeting Room, Council Caucus Room.
Rest Rooms, handicap accessible, one each.
Fire Department: Two Offices, Truck Bay for 7 trucks and 2 ambulances.
Storage: Three Storage Rooms
Total Building Area- 9,600 Sq Ft.

Estimated Building Cost -$816,000


Parking Lot for 40 cars -$39,000
Utilities -$20,000
Landscaping- $5,000
Land Acquisition (One Acre) -$20,000

GRAND TOTAL: $900,000


Findings of Fact





  1. The costs of maintenance and utilities relating to Wall Borough’s municipal building are rising. The present condition of the building coupled with current and anticipated expenses make building rehabilitation infeasible.




  1. East McKeesport’s municipal complex bears inadequate parking and a general lack of administrative space.




  1. The North Versailles municipal facilities will require repairs and expansions as indicated above, namely in terms of the police department.




  1. East McKeesport and Wall, given their smaller area and proximity, have discussed the merits of a joint administrative complex to include fire and police services. They have also discussed the inclusion of neighboring Wilmerding Borough as a partner in this development. Additionally, North Versailles recognizes the utility of its facilities to East McKeesport and Wall Boroughs.




  1. Joint services and facilities, are therefore an integral part of facilities planning and maintenance within the planning area.




  1. Finally, the organization and joint planning defined in this section help to structure future facilities in such a manner so as to consider the possibility of future municipal mergers, if or when such become feasible.



Goals, Objectives, and Action Steps

The following action steps are rooted in the findings of fact as well as the following goal and objective:



Goal 1: Provide for public facilities at a location and of a nature so as to serve the daily needs and convenience of residents of each municipality within the planning area in a cost effective manner.


  • Objective 1: Evaluate the option of establishing a joint municipal complex for the Boroughs (including Wilmerding) or of utilizing existing and planned structures in an efficient manner wherein certain functions or facilities and their maintenance are shared. Additionally, the evaluation of North Versailles’ facilities maintenance and expansions should consider or accommodate the possibility of shared services. Such study should consider the possibility of future mergers between municipalities.




    • Action Step 1: Conduct a feasibility study to assess and rank both public and private lands for the location of a joint municipal complex or shared facilities. Criteria for selection should include a location convenient to the residents of all participating communities.




    • Action Step 2: Include top ranking parcels on an Official Map as adopted by the respective municipalities.




    • Action Step 3: Execute a preliminary cooperative agreement specifying the responsibilities of each participating municipality in the planning and engineering of the facility. Said agreement may include North Versailles commitment to the provision of certain municipal spaces or services periodically required by the Boroughs.




    • Action Step 4: Prepare a “white paper” and request State capital budget funding through State Senator for the final planning and construction of joint municipal complex serving the Boroughs and library improvements for North Versailles’ police and administrative offices that includes auxiliary meeting space for Borough functions.


Goal

Objective

Action Step

Timeline

Funding Source

Estimated Costs

Responsible Parties

1

1

1

2007

Local/Private Foundation

$2,000
JPC, LGB, ME







2

2007

Local



JPC, LGB, ME






3

2008

Local


LGB







4

2008

Local

$1,000

JPC, LGB

JPC = Joint Municipal Planning Commission

LGB = Local Governing Bodies

ME = Municipal Engineer



Water Supply Plan



Assessment of Water Supply

North Versailles, East McKeesport & Wall

Glenn Engineering, December, 2005

East McKeesport

The water distribution system in East McKeesport Borough is owned and operated by the Wilkinsburg-Penn Joint Water Authority. There are no extensions planned for the system and current supply is adequate. Storage facilities were replaced within the last 5 years and are in excellent condition and sufficient for fire protection. The source of this water is the Allegheny River in Penn Hills, PA. WPJWA is a regional supplier providing water to 45,000 customers in 21 communities. The Authority has the capability to properly maintain all facilities in East McKeesport and will initiate any needed repairs as necessary.



North Versailles Township & Wall Borough

The water distribution system in North Versailles Township and Wall is owned and operated by the Municipal Authority of Westmoreland County. There are no extensions planned for the system and current supply is adequate. Extensions for new developments are constructed as development occurs. Storage facilities were renovated within the last 5 years and are in excellent condition and sufficient for fire protection. The sources of this water are Beaver Run Reservoir in Washington Twp., Westmoreland County and the Youghiogheny River in McKeesport. MAWC is a regional supplier providing water to customers in western Westmoreland County and eastern Allegheny County .The Authority has the capability to properly maintain all facilities in North Versailles and Wall and will initiate any needed repairs as necessary.



Statement of Interrelationships

This section and following points of interrelationships aim to address the relationships among various plan components in an effort to clarify areas of possible contradiction. This section also aims to highlight the relationships between recommendations in separate chapters of the plan, their consistency, and the sequential impacts on one chapter’s recommendations on another.


The MPC requirements state the following:
“A statement of the interrelationships among the various plan components, which may include an estimate of the environmental, energy conservation, fiscal, economic development and social consequences on the municipality.”


  1. Neighborhood improvements and associated amenities including lighting, sidewalks, facades, trails, and street improvements relate equally to the sustenance and revitalization of both residential and commercial development. Thus they are integral to both the provision of adequate housing and economic development within the planning area.




  1. The future land use plan identifies areas for commercial, mixed use, residential, and public development. However, these categories are assumed to include open spaces within future subdivision, land development plans and planned residential developments, areas denoted on an Official Map as an option for future purchase as such, and environmentally constrained areas on which development should be limited. The character, amount, and location of these spaces should be clearly defined in a joint subdivision and zoning ordinance, as well as an Official Map considering the open space in the planning area as a whole.




  1. The future land use map includes “rural residential” as a district intentionally coincident with steep slopes. The purpose of this district is to provide for low density housing in conjunction with steep slope standards in an effort to preserve, rather than encouraging the development of these areas. It should also be understood that, regardless of the district, slope standards limited development in such areas shall be addressed in the zoning, subdivision, and grading ordinances for the entire planning area, not only “rural residential.”




  1. Necessary transportation improvements, namely those at key intersections and near the planned interchange with the Mon-Fayette Expressway, should be considered on an Official Map as a future right-of-way. All such right-of-ways shall be considered as an intended use apart from that specified on the future land use map.




  1. Trails and other recreational amenities shall relate to the transportation and movement of people in general and shall be considered such that they allow for efficient movement of people from residential to recreational and commercial areas of the planning area, especially in areas of greater pedestrian scale, namely within the boroughs.




  1. New Mixed Use and Planned Residential Developments should consider and relate to adjacent pedestrian and greenway corridors, where appropriate.




  1. New open spaces required through revised and implemented mandatory land dedication provisions shall to the furthest extent possible, relate to the adopted Comprehensive Parks, Recreation, and Open Space plan for North Versailles or as also adopted by East McKeesport and Wall Boroughs.



Plan and Project Summary, Capital Improvements Plan




Introduction and Statement of Purpose

The Municipalities Planning Code, Section 301, includes the following statement in regards to capital improvements planning and comprehensive planning:


“A discussion of short- and long-range plan implementation strategies, which may include implications for capital improvements programming, new or updated development regulations, and identification of public funds potentially available.”
As the concluding section of the multi-municipal plan, this section summarizes and unites the individual plans through capital improvements planning. For purposes of this chapter, capital improvements shall include the purchase of consultant services, municipal program development, as well as capital equipment and infrastructure improvements. Each item summarizes key projects outlined in one or more chapters of this plan, including timelines, and funding sources. While this chapter draws upon the interrelationships of each chapter of plan and summarizes key recommendations, each separate plan contains specific and important implementation steps that are not necessarily cited within this chapter.


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