Still Life from 14th March to 7th April 2007



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PRESS RELEASE


Charles Jones
Still Life


from 14th March to 7th April 2007

Tuesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday 10.30 am – 7.30 pm

Wednesday and Tuesday 10.30 am – 9.00 pm

Monday 3.30 pm – 7.30 pm

In collaboration with Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York


Galleria Carla Sozzani

Corso Como 10 – Milano

Tel. 02.653531 – Fax 02.29004080

E-mail: info@galleriacarlasozzani.com

Sito: http://www.galleriacarlasozzani.org
Charles Jones
Still Life

Charles Jones’s photography represents an unicum in itself. His still-life photographs, whose subjects are natural elements (flowers, fruit, vegetables) are similar to the oil paintings that at the time Jones was taking his pictures, in the early 19th century, were gracing the Victorian mansions interiors. At the same time, his production bears innovative traits deriving not only by the photographic medium, but that are proper to the original vision of its author, who can be regarded as an outsider in the field of art photography.


Born in England in 1866, Jones undertook gardening early in life, an activity which was to become is main profession and from which he derived his interest for the many forms and varieties of natural life. Working ten years at the Ote Hall, in Susset, he improved his gardening skills while practising his amateurish photographic techniques, to which he transferred his keen eye for details.
It is quite likely that Jones’s first interest in photography was mainly a way to catalogue the many varieties of fruit and flowers he encountered in his every day activity. Yet, his technique and image composition surpass a mere archival scope, while bearing some truly original features. For instance, he chose to depict natural elements out from their context, in a studio setting, with a prepared backcloth, a type of presentation in use at the time for portraits, not for still lives. In other photographs, he arranged elements in geometrical, artificially repeating patterns, while his use of light add some to the iconic status of the subjects.
Because of these traits that anticipate Modernist avant-gardes, Jones’s work can be seen as a precursor of the later, more self-conscious productions of photographers in the Twenties and Thirties such as Karl Blossfeldt, Paul Outerbridge, Edward Steichen, Josef Sudek and Edward Weston.
Charles Jones’s work was fully recognized only posthumously: in the early Eighties a collector found a set of photographs in an old trunk at an antique market. The photographs represented an exceptional varieties of subjects, fruit and vegetables whose names were carefully handwritten on the back, along with the initials C. J. or with his full name. These are his only notes: Jones never left written explanations about his work and his aesthetic choices. His photographs are unique editions, since no negative was left.
Since this fortuitous discovery, Jones’s work has known a growing appreciation and popularity: in 1988 Robert Flynn Johnson curated an exhibit at the de Young Museum in San Francisco, as well as the catalogue The Plant Kingdoms of Charles Jones. The same year the exhibition moved to Lausanne, at the Musée de l’Elysée. In 2005 the London Folio Society listed Bean Runner among the 100 greatest photographs of all time. In 2006 a solo exhibit at the Howard Greenberg Gallery further increased the fortunes of this original outsider.

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