Scope of Work What is the name of the applicant agency and the 21



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Narrative Section

21st Century Community Learning Centers

CMB Visions Unlimited, Inc. - The Be A Success In School (B.A.S.I.S.) Program
Scope of Work

What is the name of the applicant agency and the 21st CCLC program?

Agency Name: CMB Visions Unlimited, Inc. –


Program Name: Be A Success In School (B.A.S.I.S.) Program
What populations will be served?

CMB Visions Unlimited, Inc. proposes to serve 50 kindergarten through eighth grade students and their families that reside in the Richmond Heights, Perrine, Goulds, Naranja, Cutler Bay and South Miami Heights communities, and that attend our target schools. These communities have a high concentration of moderate to low-incomes households.



What schools will be targeted for services?

The B.A.S.I.S. Program targets students from 12 schools: five (5) elementary schools- Caribbean, Colonial, Cutler Ridge, Ethel Beckford Richmond, Goulds, Pine Lake, Pine Villa and RR. Moton; one (1) K-8 Center- Coconut Palm; and three (3) middle schools- Centennial, Cutler Ridge and Mays Community. These target schools are Title I eligible schools, as over 40% of the student population receives free or reduced lunch. These schools are also located in areas that have a high concentration of moderate to low-incomes households.



How many students will be served total and by site?

Via the B.A.S.I.S. Program CMB Visions will provide services to 50 students grades K-8th and their parents and family members.



What days per week and hours per day will the program operate (by site or all sites)?

Services will be offered five (5) days per week from 2pm to 6pm for 180 days and from 8am to 5pm for 19 days (winter/spring break and teacher planning days). We are also offering services one Saturday of each month during the school year from 9 am-3pm for a total of 10 Saturdays. Summer camp will be offered for five (5) days per week from June 9, 2014 to July 31, 2014 for a total of 38 days – hours of operation will be 8am to 5pm.



What services will be provided to students and adults?

Project Based Learning (PBL) implemented in our program expose our students to science, reading, engineering and math five (5) days per week for 60 minutes per day. Lesson plans developed by Certified Teachers and are in accordance with the Project Plan outlined in Part B. Students may also receive remediation in core academic subjects which will complement the PBL activities; remediation in reading, math and science is a critical component due to the levels of proficiency the students we serve. To increase proficiency levels, we offer homework assistance and small group instruction in core subjects, and students receive additional support from certified teachers and tutors. Other activities that are implemented daily include physical fitness and homework assistance. These activities are implemented for 60 minutes per day as well. Technology and drug and violence prevention activities are 2-3 times per week for 30 minutes as well. CMB Visions will offer families of actively participating 21st CCLC students’ opportunities to participate in workshops that focus on financial management, literacy and related educational development. These services will be provided monthly, at a minimum, however, some months multiple workshops may be offered based on need and demand. Workshops are designed to increase the involvement of the family in the student’s education, develop literacy and/or educational skills that will enable parents to be supportive of the student’s learning.



What is the duration of the proposed activities (e.g., weeks, months)?

Services will be offered five (5) days per week from 2pm to 6pm for 180 days and from 8am to 5pm for 19 days (winter/spring break and teacher planning days). We are also offering services one Saturday of each month during the school year from 9 am-3pm for a total of 10 Saturdays. Summer camp will be offered for five (5) days per week from June 9, 2014 to July 31, 2014 for a total of 38 days – hours of operation will be 8am to 5pm. Program activities have strong linkages to the regular school day and will be implemented in four 9-week modules during after school and one 8-week module during the summer. Academic enrichment activities address real world experiences such as newspaper publishing, engineering design, crime scene investigation and core subject remediation. Personal enrichment activities include drug and violence prevention education, tutoring and homework assistance and the implementation of Sports, Play and Recreation (SPARK), an evidenced based physical fitness curriculum.



What is the staffing plan for the program (number of staff, ratios, etc.)?

The program is staffed with 1 site manager, 1 program coordinator, 3 certified teachers, 3 group leaders/tutors, and 1 program assistant. While students are on site we maintain secure controlled environments. Academic and project based learning activities are conducted in a secure indoor facility with student ratios that do not exceed 1:15. During off-site activities ratio is reduced to 1:10 - this is a necessity in order to effectively and safely manage large groups of students.



Describe the facility.

The CMB Visions Unlimited Learning Center, the program services delivery location site, is 3200 sq. ft. with 4 rooms, 2 large group study areas/classrooms, a computer lab, training room a separate activity room/play area. The facility has accessible parking and entrances, curb cuts for the sidewalks, 32 inch door openings, 36 inch hallways, fully accessible restrooms, drinking fountains and telephones. These accommodations comply with the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.



Describe how the facility is safe and easily accessible.

While students are on site we maintain secure controlled environments; academic activities are conducted in a secure indoor facility with student ratios that do not exceed 1:15. During off-site activities ratio is reduced to 1:10; this is a necessity in order to effectively manage a large group of students. Personnel that have direct contract with students have the following prior to employment: a) Level II background screening clearance, b) current Attestation of Good Moral Character on file and, c) First Aid and CPR certification d) current Florida Department of Education certification (certified teachers only). Staff is well versed in safety procedures including fire drills, emergency evacuation and lock down procedures. Regardless of service delivery location the safety and security of the students is replicated across all sites in the same manner. Student files are maintained electronically and include registration forms with emergency contact information, authorizations (transportation, field trips, and emergency medical), information about special needs or conditions that may affect a students’ ability to participate in all program activities. The facility has accessible parking and entrances, curb cuts for the sidewalks, 32 inch door openings, 36 inch hallways, fully accessible restrooms, drinking fountains and telephones. These accommodations comply with the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.



Principles of Effectiveness

CMB Visions had made some great strides to improve the efficacy and quality of the after school and summer programs were offer. The most notable change has been the closing of our Youth Impact Ministries Site – based on observations by CMB staff and our evaluators it was determined that this site had some challenges concerning operations, efficiency, safety, security and supervision. Our evaluators noted the two sites appeared to operate independently of each other and that more collaboration was encouraged to ensure that all proposed activities were properly implemented during program year. After much consideration and deliberation, we deemed that quality over quantity was most important and we moved to close the Youth Impact Site.

During the first year of implementation it was noted in our formative evaluation that CMB has experienced some challenges with data collection which created obstacles in determining which students would benefit from remediation in core academic subjects. To effectively address this challenge and improve program effectiveness strategies have been implement to ensure that report cards, interim reports and other forms of academic progress are readily accessible so that students who require academic remediation can receive the support they need. Moreover, continuous data collection and review of findings of data analyses will be a priority this year in order to ensure implementation of an effective long-term program.

Another area that was targeted for improvement as a result of the formative evaluation was the interpersonal communication skills of students that attend our program. It was noted that the vast majority of the students appear to have good conflict resolution and goal setting and decision making skills; however the data revealed that communication skills could be improved, particularly among elementary students. To address this finding, program staff began to focus on enrichment activities such As Too Good for Drugs and Alcohol and PBL activities that fostered effective communication during the second half of the school year.

Finally, with respect to technological proficiency, self-report data showed that the majority of the students require additional training with respect to the use of grade-appropriate technology. As an improvement strategy, in addition to the purchase of additional computers, program staff expanded the work products of the project-based learning activities to entail the use of a variety of technology and media. Computers were used for projection purposes to introduce a new activity or project, and used for by students to research information pertaining their PBL activities. If students are required to create work products that require use of multiple media and forms of technology, it is expected that learning gains will increase.

Program Fees and Program Income

CMB Vision Unlimited does not charge a fee to attend the B.A.S.I.S. after school and summer camp 21st Century Community Learning Center programs funded by the Florida Department of Education. Moreover, these programs do not generate program income.



Student Safety

Our site serves multiple schools and strong relationships exist between school personnel and program staff. Some students live nearby and walk to the program, some are dropped off by private transportation services and others are eligible to receive transportation provided by the M-DCPS. A daily transportation log is checked by the driver when a student boards the bus and it is checked again by program staff when the student arrives on site. At dismissal the parent or someone authorized by the parent must sign the student out of the program - under no circumstances are students permitted to walk home from the program – this is a condition of enrollment that parents must agree to accept. While students are on site we maintain secure controlled environments; academic activities are conducted in a secure indoor facility with student ratios that do not exceed 1:15. During off-site activities ratio is reduced to 1:10; this is a necessity in order to effectively manage a large group of students.

Personnel that have direct contract with students have the following prior to employment: a) Level II background screening clearance, b) current Attestation of Good Moral Character on file and, c) First Aid and CPR certification d) current Florida Department of Education certification (certified teachers only). Staff is well versed in safety procedures including fire drills, emergency evacuation and lock down procedures. Regardless of service delivery location the safety and security of the students is replicated across all sites in the same manner. Student files are maintained electronically and include registration forms with emergency contact information, authorizations (transportation, field trips, and emergency medical), information about special needs or conditions that may affect a students’ ability to participate in all program activities.

Academic and Personal Enrichment - Part A

Project Goals

The goals of our program are to provide additional academic and personal enrichment opportunities for students in a safe, nurturing learning environment through project based learning activities that are aligned with the Common Core and Next Generation Sunshine State Standards. Our services are provided with the general goal of improving academic performance, developing well rounded students, high school graduation and the pursuit of a post-secondary education. Students that reside in lower socio-economic environments often do not have the opportunity to attend high quality out-of-school programs to intervene in the direction their lives may be heading.



Project Objectives

Intended

Behavioral, Knowledge and Skill Change

Target of Behavioral, Knowledge and Skill Change

Measurement

Tool

Criteria for Success

When Expected Outcome Will Occur

1. Improved writing skills as evidenced by scores on standardized reading tests and Writing Rubric.

Regularly participating students (i.e., students who attended program for 30 day or more)


FCAT Writing Rubric (8th and 10th grade), Reading/Language Arts report card grade


75% of students demonstrate an improvement

6/2/2014

2. Increased reading skills as demonstrated by scores on standardized reading tests and report cards.

Regularly participating students


Language/Arts Reading report card grades



75% of students demonstrate an increase

6/2/2014


3. Increased math skills as evidenced by scores on standardized math tests and report cards.

Regularly participating students

.


FCAT, Math report card grades



75% of students demonstrate an increase

6/2/2014

4. Increased science skills as evidenced by scores on science standardized tests and report cards

Regularly participating students


Science report card grades



75% of students demonstrate an increase

6/2/2014

5.Improvement in decision-making, communication, media literacy and conflict resolution skills as demonstrated by the Pre/post TGFD & V After-School Youth Survey

Regularly participating students


TGFD & V After-School Youth Survey



80% of students demonstrate an improvement

6/2/2014

6. Improvement in physical fitness as demonstrated by performance on PACERS Multi-Stage Shuttle Run.

Regularly participating students

Pre/Post PACERS Multi-Stage Shuttle Run



80% of students demonstrate an increase

6/2/2014

7. Increased sense of responsibility for completing homework assignments as demonstrated by a parent surveys on homework completion.

Regularly participating students


Parent surveys



80% of students demonstrate an increase

6/2/2014

8. Increased telecommunication and technology skills as demonstrated by pre/post tests.

Regularly participating students


Pre/post tests on technology



80% of students demonstrate an increase

June 2, 2014


Project Based Activities

Project Based Learning (PBL) implemented in our program expose our students to science, reading, engineering and math five (5) days per week for 60 minutes per day. Lesson plans developed by Certified Teachers and are in accordance with the Project Plan outlined in Part B. Students may also receive remediation in core academic subjects which will complement the PBL activities; remediation in reading, math and science is a critical component due to the levels of proficiency the students we serve. To increase proficiency levels, we offer homework assistance and small group instruction in core subjects’ students receive additional support from certified teachers and tutors. Other activities that are implemented daily include physical fitness and homework assistance; these activities are implemented for 60 minutes per day as well. Technology and drug and violence prevention activities are 2-3 times per week for 30 minutes as well.



Project #1 - How Does Your Garden Grow?

Students will learn how to build houses and determine which type of device has the best sustainability and success rate for keeping rabbits out of the garden.



Project #2 - The Three Little Pigs

This lesson is based on the Three Little Pigs story. In this activity the students are to imagine that there are no bricks available and that they have to help the third pig by using the Engineering Design Process. They will build a house for the third little pig so that when the wolf comes to visit, he will not huff and puff and blow the house down.



Project #3 - CMB Connection

Students will work collectively to create and publish a newspaper. Students will identify the parts of a newspaper, identify the format of a news article, write a newspaper story edit newspaper articles, use computer and internet, and layout and publish a newspaper



Project #4 - What Happened? How Did it Happen?

A simulated crime scene is presented for teams of students to solve, using clues received, and adjusting hypotheses as more clues are found and discussed. The elements of science are recognized through discussion of the crime solution metaphor. This project also demonstrates how science is used effectively to reveal events of the past (by weighing the evidence), much as we do in paleontology, geology, evolution and astronomy.



Cohesive Programming

The activities offered during after school program are seamless and designed to provide a comprehensive cohesive academic and personal enrichment program that assists our students to improve academic performance. Not all students required the same level of services and the program offers flexibility for students with various academic needs. For example, a student who does not require remediation services, additional time may be allocated to working on PBL activities. Conversely, students who need core subject remediation may alternate these services with personal enrichment activities on an as needed basis.


Sample After School Schedule




Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

(early release)



Thursday

Friday

2:00-2:30







Arrival/Snack







2:30-3:00

Arrival/Snack

Arrival/Snack

Technology

Arrival/Snack

Arrival/Snack

3:00-3:30

Academics PBL

Academics

PBL


Academics PBL

Academics

PBL


Academics

PBL


3:30-4:00

Academics PBL

Academics

PBL


Academics PBL

Academics

PBL


Academics

PBL


4:00-4:30

Homework

Homework

Homework

Homework

Homework

4:30-5:00*

Homework

Study Island



Homework

Study Island



Homework

Study Island



Homework

Study Island



Homework

Study Island



5:00-5:30

Fitness

Fitness

Fitness

Fitness

Fitness

5:30-6:00

Technology

Tutoring


Technology

Tutoring


Drug

violence prevention



Technology

Tutoring


Drug violence prevention

*core subject remediation may be offered during this this time frame on an as needed basis.
Adult Family Member Services

Objectives

Intended

Behavioral, Knowledge and Skill Change

Target of Behavioral, Knowledge and Skill Change

Measurement

Tool

Criteria for Success

When Expected Outcome Will Occur

9. Increased knowledge on workshop topics

Parents of regularly participating students


Pre/post surveys and will send data to QQRC for analysis

80% of parents increase knowledge

June 2, 2014

10. Participation in at three at least three Adult Family Member Services activities.

Parents of regularly participating students a


Attendance/sign-in sheets

80% of parents attend

June 2, 2014

CMB Visions will offer families of actively participating 21st CCLC students’ opportunities to participate in workshops that focus on financial management, literacy and related educational development. These services will be provided monthly, at a minimum, however; some months multiple workshops may be offered based on need and demand. Workshops are designed to increase the involvement of the family in the students’ education, develop literacy and/or educational skills that will enable parents to be supportive of the students learning.


Recruitment and retention of parents is challenging however, we rely on written materials as well as phone calls and home visits to overcome any language, literacy, or cultural barriers. Meetings are scheduled when it is convenient for parents and they are notified well in advance. When possible, CMB offers assistance with transportation and child care; in general we create an environment that says, “We respect everyone. We understand and will try to accommodate your unique needs and concerns. Having parents as volunteers has proven effective as well – when they see their child fully participating in activities it motivates them to become more involved. Workshops may include but are not limited to: P.S., I Love You, a class on effective nurturing skills which teaches parents disciplinary skills, tips on controlling anger, practicing assertive discipline, and preventing child abuse. Community health education focuses on promoting good nutrition, preventing communicable diseases, learning about first aid and CPR, and promoting self-esteem and good mental health. The culminating event is a graduation ceremony for the parents who earned their certificates in administering CPR and first aid. Father/Daughter - Mother/Son – generational differences parents and their children also present a challenge. To bridge this gap a dance for parents and their children provide an opportunity to socialize and have fun. Potlucks are casual dinners that make it convenient for parents to attend evening meetings and events, provide an informal setting for interaction among parents, program staff and students and foster the kind of informal communication that can be otherwise difficult to achieve. School day teachers are invited to attend and child care is provided if needed, a strategy that has led to higher attendance rates.

Learning about M-DCPS educates parents about public school governance, Virtual School, the Parent Academy, benefits of Title 1, how to access the Parent Portal, where to go and who to talk to when they have specific needs. The more knowledge and information parents have, the more likely they are to be involved. Breast Cancer Awareness month is in October and health professionals visit to speak about breast health, self-examination, early detection and screening and understanding risk factors. Health Screenings may help find diseases or conditions early, when they are easier to treat and include screenings for hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis and high cholesterol. Homework and Study Habits provides parents with helpful suggestions on how they can assist their teen develop good homework and study habits. This workshop helps parents gain knowledge that will assist them in helping their child achieve maximum success throughout their education. Family Strengthening focuses on family strengthening in order to create or build upon a support network. Activities are offered in two hour sessions where students are and their families meet separately for the first hour and then the families practice skills and have fun together during the second hour. “Keeping Tabs” an interactive web based workshops that teaches parents how to access and use the M-DCPS Parent Portal and Study Island to track their child’s progress, grades, attendance, FCAT scores and homework completion record.

Due to low educational attainment rates of adults in the communities CMB Vision also offers Family Literacy workshops that focus on family literacy and provide information regarding post-secondary educational opportunities (college, vocational/occupational and technical, etc.). Education is one mechanism that working families can use to move up the socioeconomic ladder.



Evaluation Plan

Q-Q Research Consultants (QQRC) will serve as the evaluator for B.A.S.I.S.QQRC is a full service consulting firm with extensive experience in research and program evaluation including experience evaluating 21st CCLC programs in Broward and Miami-Dade Counties. QQRC staff includes doctoral level professionals with advanced academic training in quantitative and qualitative research methodologies.

QQRC proposes to implement a systematic evaluation process as a means to examine progress towards meeting each of the proposed goals, objectives, and milestones. The evaluation process will include an evaluation plan which outlines the evaluation framework, the evaluation design, objectives and goals, questions to be addressed in the evaluation, identification of assessment tools, timeframe for evaluation activities, methods and procedures for evaluating objectives, and procedures for managing and monitoring the evaluation.

The evaluation process also includes data collection activities which will include both objective quantitative data that will occur at three time points; baseline, mid-year, and end-of-year and qualitative data. Quantitative data will include enrollment data, attendance data, academic data (e.g., reports grades, FCAT data to be collected in conjunction with APR reporting guidelines), and data captured from assessments and surveys. Qualitative data will be captured from surveys and interviews with teachers, parents, students. QQRC will be responsible for collecting assessment data, survey data, and qualitative which will include data collected from open-ended items from surveys and interviews. Using data amassed over the course of the year, the evaluation of B.A.S.I.S. will address the following program goals:



  1. Did regularly participating students’ math, science, and technology proficiency improve following participation in B.A.S.I.S.?

  2. Did regularly participating students’ improve their decision-making, communication, m and conflict resolution skills following participation in B.A.S.I.S.?

  3. Did the parents of regularly participating students increase their knowledge on a variety of topics presented to them designed to support their children’s academic performance?

To find answers to the identified evaluation questions and measure the overall impact of the B.A.S.I.S. on youth participants and parents, a mixed methodology using the above mentioned quantitative and qualitative data will be employed. Using quantitative data, pre/mid/post analyses will be conducted to examine changes that occurred as a result of program participation. Analyses will include descriptive analyses on program and participant characteristics (e.g. mean Math FCAT scores); outcome/goal analyses to examine changes based on the implementation of academic enrichment, personal enrichment, and adult family member services (e.g. pre and post test scores); and qualitative analyses to identify youth, parents’, and staff’s perspectives on program services via focus group responses.

As part of the evaluation process, QQRC will also conduct monitoring site visits(i.e., late Fall and early Spring) consisting of the following activities: (1) completion of a semi-structured interview with program staff, (2) observations of the delivery of program components, and (3) an exit meeting to discuss monitoring findings. To gather additional qualitative data, QQRC staff will conduct focus groups with parents.

The evaluation process will also include a Formative Evaluation Report (due February 28, 2014) and a Summative Evaluation Report (due August 31, 2014) to be submitted to the FDOE by the respective deadlines. In an effort to adequately demonstrate mid-year progress, data analyses for the Formative Report will include data collected from baseline and mid-year assessments. The Formative Evaluation Reports will include student attendance, program operation, objective assessment, and recommendations. The Formative Evaluation Reports will be used to monitor the program’s progress towards achieving objectives and to provide information to program staff and other stakeholders about the program’s success. To examine the overall impact of the program, data analyses for the Summative Report will include data collected at baseline, mid-year and end-of-year time points. The Summative Evaluation Report will include overview and history, student attendance and enrollment, program operation, quality of staffing, objective assessment, progress towards sustainability, overall recommendations, and any notable observations. The last grant year summative evaluation report will reflect the entire five-year period.

QQRC staff will also attend meetings with the Advisory Board and with B.A.S.I.S. staff no less than three times a year to provide a review all reports and observations from monitoring visits, and to discuss any feedback. These meetings will inform continuous quality improvement efforts. Additionally, all evaluation reports are posted on the program’s website for viewing by all stakeholders and the public, and program staff’s contact information is made available on website for any feedback regarding reports.If any substantial modifications regarding program delivery are needed, program staff will collaborate with the Children’s Forum to implement an action plan.

There are a number of quality controls integrated into the proposed project’s design. All QQRC staff will adhere to the principles of confidentiality and will comply with ethical guidelines. All data collection and storage will adhere to the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 guidelines. QQRC staff will cooperate with 21st CCLC Statewide Evaluation Team regarding access to all requested records. QQRC will utilize the federal 21st CCLC Principles of Effectiveness to guide the evaluation. QQRC supervisors will host weekly meetings and provide close supervision for all evaluation activities including supervising survey administration, facilitation of focus groups, and preparation of data for analysis.
Dissemination Plan

CMB Visions is a well-established organization and has been operating youth focused program for several years. Information about the 21st CCLC is widely disseminated in the targeted schools, other nearby public and private schools, the library and the South Dade Government Center, churches, child care centers, public housing projects and “corner stores” via informational flyers and brochures. Information is also disseminated at events such as The Children’s Trust Family Expo which generally attracts more than 20,000 visitors each year. Because of the positive relationships we have with participating schools, we have been invited to attend open houses and career and health fairs to conduct presentations about the 21st CCLC program and its overall goals. We are also in the final stages of development of our monthly newsletter that highlights the 21st CCLC program to be posted on our website at http://www.cmbvisionsunlimited.org/ distributed to parents, schools and other community based organizations; when feasible, public service announcements will be conducted with local radio and public television stations. Our websites is updated monthly to reflect 21st CCLC program and we will work with other community based organizations to have our website places as a link on their website.




CMB Visions Unlimited, Inc. Page



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