Supervisor: Kedra Gamble Curriculum Coordinator



Download 402.47 Kb.
Sana24.06.2017
Hajmi402.47 Kb.
South Plainfield Public Schools

Curriculum Guide



c:\documents and settings\prafalowski\my documents\my pictures\tiger logo.jpg
Social Studies

Grade 1

Authors:
Mary Beth Boschen

Laura Mottley


Supervisor:
Kedra Gamble
Curriculum Coordinator:
Paul C. Rafalowski
Board Approved on: August 29, 2012

Table of Contents

South Plainfield Public Schools Board of Education Members

and Administration Page: 3
Recognitions Page: 4
District Mission Statement Page: 5
Index of Courses Page: 6

Curriculum Guide Page: 7-23




Members of the Board of Education
Jim Giannakis, President

Sharon Miller, Vice President

Carol Byrne

John T. Farinella, Jr.

Christopher Hubner

William Seesselberg

Joseph Sorrentino

Gary Stevenson




Central Office Administration
Dr. Stephen Genco, Superintendent of Schools

Dr. Frank Cocchiola, Interim Assistant Superintendent of Schools

Mr. James Olobardi, Board Secretary/ BA

Mr. Frank Esposito, Director of Special Services

Ms. Kedra Gamble, Supervisor of Language Arts Literacy and Social Studies

Mr. Vincent Parisi, Supervisor of Math and Science

Mrs. Marlene Steele, Supervisor of Transportation

Mrs. Annemarie Stoeckel, Supervisor of Technology

Ms. Elaine Gallo, Director of Guidance

Mr. Al Czech, Director of Athletics

Mr. Paul Rafalowski, Curriculum Coordinator
Recognitions

The following individuals are recognized for their support in developing this Curriculum Guide:

Grade/Course Writer(s)

Kindergarten: Joy Czaplinski and Patricia Publik

Grade 1: Mary Beth Boschen and Laura Mottley

Grade 2: Cate Bonanno and Maria Sottiriou

Grade 3: Angela Raimondo-Hajduk and Teresa Luck

Grade 4: Laura McCreesh

Grade 5: Rebecca Gross and Dana Hauck

Grade 6: Rebecca Gross and Dana Hauck

Grade 7: Joe Blondo and Melody Haggerty

Grade 8: Joe Bennett and Barbara Pinelli

World History Miten Shah and Ken Skillman

United States History 1 Frances Flannery and Miten Shah

United States History 2 Brandon Crosby and Frances Flannery

Government Brandon Crosby

Law Brandon Crosby

Sociology Brandon Crosby

Genocide Studies Frances Flannery

International Relations Miten Shah



Supervisors:

Supervisor of LAL and Social Studies: Ms. Kedra Gamble

Supervisor of Mathematics and Science: Mr. Vince Parisi

Curriculum Coordinator: Mr. Paul C. Rafalowski

Supervisor of Technology: Ms. Annemarie Stoeckel

South Plainfield Public Schools

District Mission Statement

To ensure that all pupils are equipped with essential skills necessary to acquire a common body of knowledge and understanding;
To instill the desire to question and look for truth in order that pupils may become critical thinkers, life-long learners, and contributing members of society in an environment of mutual respect and consideration.
It is the expectation of this school district that all pupils achieve the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards at all grade levels.
Adopted September, 2008


Index of Social Studies Courses
Elementary Schools

(Franklin, Kennedy, Riley, Roosevelt)
Kindergarten

Grade 1


Grade 2

Grade 3


Grade 4
Grant School
Grade 5

Grade 6
Middle School


Grade 7

Grade 8
High School


World History

Academic World History

Honors World History

United States History 1

Academic United States History 1

Honors United States History 1

United States History 2

Academic United States History 2

Honors United States History 2

Advanced Placement United States History

Genocide Studies

Sociology

Government

Law


International Relations

Economics and Financial Literacy




South Plainfield Public Schools Curriculum Guide

Content Area: Social Studies

Course Title: Grade 1 Social Studies

Grade Level: 1st Grade





Unit 1:Citizenship and Government







7 Weeks










Unit 2:Community Workers






7 Weeks











Unit 3:Places and Cultures Around the World






7 Weeks












Unit 4:The United States and Maps





7-8 Weeks











Unit 5: Celebrations of People, Cultures, and Events





7 Weeks





















Board Approved on:

August 29, 2012




Unit 1

Content Area – Social Studies

Unit Title – Citizenship and Government

Target Course/Grade Level – Grade 1 Social Studies

Unit Summary/Rationale – During this unit, students will learn that South Plainfield is a town in New Jersey, and New Jersey is a state in the United States. Being an active and responsible citizen can have a positive impact on what happens in each community.

Interdisciplinary Connections – Language Arts, Mathematics, Art

Technology Integration – Smart Board (if available), Projector (if available)

21st Century Themes –

Civic Literacy



21st Century Skills –

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving, Communication and Collaboration




Learning Targets

Standard(s)6.1 U.S. History: America in the World:

All students will acquire the knowledge and skills to think analytically about how past and present interactions of people, cultures, and the environment shape the American heritage. Such knowledge and skills enable students to make informed decisions that reflect fundamental rights and core democratic values as productive citizens in local, national, and global communities.



Strand(s) – A. Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Content Statement(s) –The United States Constitution and Bill of Rights guarantee certain fundamental rights for citizens.

Cumulative Progress Indicator(s) (CPI) –

6.1.4.A.2: Explain how fundamental rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights (i.e., freedom of expression, freedom of religion, the right to vote, and the right to due process) contribute to the continuation and improvement of American democracy.

Content Statement(s) –

The United States democratic system requires active participation of its citizens.



Cumulative Progress Indicator(s) (CPI) –

6.1.4. A.11: Explain how the fundamental rights of the individual and the common good of the country depend upon all citizens exercising their civic responsibilities at the community, state, national, and global levels.

Unit Essential Questions

  • How can a citizen contribute to his/her community?

  • Why is it important for citizens to vote in the presidential election?




Unit Enduring Understandings

  • A citizen is a member of a community. Being a citizen of a community can allow an individual certain rights and/or privileges.

  • Citizens must work together to cause change in their communities.

Terminology: citizen, government, city, state, country, president, election, community





Goals/Objectives
Students will be able to -

Learning Activities/Instructional Strategies

Evidence of Learning
(Formative & Summative)




  1. Distinguish between city, state, and country



  1. Assess and determine why it is important for citizens to play an active role in their communities.



  1. Participate in the process of an election by acting out a class election.



1. Use circles of yarn to make a large bulls-eye on the floor with three circles to represent South Plainfield, New Jersey, and the United States. Have students that live in the US stand in largest circle. Ask residents of NJ to move to medium-sized circle. Ask residents of South Plainfield to move to smallest circle. Lead students through discussion about city, state, and country.

2a. Guide students through writing a class story about how school would be different if the kids were in charge.

2b. To illustrate the importance of everyone having a say in a society, choose two students with very different interests to be the king/queen for a week. The king/queen choose a free time activity that all of the class must participate in each day.

3. Conduct a class election in which students will vote for a specific outcome (i.e. vote for a student to hold a classroom job, vote for a special snack or activity, etc.)



1. Formative Assessment – Have students draw a map of the US, showing New Jersey and South Plainfield on their maps.

2a. Students write a few sentences about why teachers make the decisions at school.

2b. Compare/contrast how the king/queen’s decisions were different and how that made the rest of the class feel.

3Students pair-share to justify the vote they cast in the class election.



Diverse Learners (ELL, Special Ed, Gifted & Talented)- Differentiation strategies may include, but are not limited to, learning centers and cooperative learning activities in either heterogeneous or homogeneous groups, depending on the learning objectives and the number of students who need further support and scaffolding, versus those who need more challenge and enrichment. Modifications may also be made as they relate to the special needs of students in accordance with their Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) or 504 plans, or English Language Learners (ELL). These may include, but are not limited to, extended time, copies of class notes, refocusing strategies, preferred seating, study guides, and/or suggestions from special education or ELL teachers.


Resources - Silver Burdett Ginn Social Studies Book 1997, US map showing New Jersey and South Plainfield, Weekly Reader (if available)





Unit 2

Content Area – Social Studies

Unit Title – Community Workers

Target Course/Grade Level – Grade 1 Social Studies

Unit Summary/Rationale – During this unit, students will learn that community workers can be divided into two groups; safety workers, and community helpers. Safety workers keep us safe in different areas of our community. Community helpers assist us with various daily needs in our community.


Interdisciplinary Connections – Language Arts, Drama

Technology Integration – Smart Board (if available), Projector (if available)

21st Century Themes –

Civic Literacy, Health Literacy, and Environmental Literacy



21st Century Skills

Creativity/Innovation, Critical Thinking/Problem Solving, Communication and Collaboration, Life & Career Skills




Learning Targets

Standard(s) – 6.1 U.S. History: America in the World:

All students will acquire the knowledge and skills to think analytically about how past and present interactions of people, cultures, and the environment shape the American heritage. Such knowledge and skills enable students to make informed decisions that reflect fundamental rights and core democratic values as productive citizens in local, national, and global communities.



Strand(s) – B. Geography, People, and the Environment

Content Statement(s) –

Everyone is part of a larger neighborhood and community.



Cumulative Progress Indicator(s) (CPI) –

6.1. P.B.2: Identify, discuss, and role-play the duties of a range of community workers.


Unit Essential Questions

  • How do different types of community workers help us in our daily lives?

  • What types of situations would require the help of a community worker?

  • What are some tools that different community workers use to help them do their jobs?

  • What are the different ways that community workers obtain their jobs?




Unit Enduring Understandings

  • Community helpers can help us complete daily tasks (i.e. garbage removal, mail delivery). Safety workers help keep us safe (i.e. crossing the street safely, taking care of us when we’re sick).

  • Each community worker uses different tools to help them do their jobs. It is important that we recognize these tools, and understand how they are used.

  • Some community workers are hired by their boss, while others are elected by the community.

Terminology: community worker, community helper, safety worker, mail carrier, garbage collector, teacher, crossing guard, bus driver, doctor, nurse, paramedic, police officer, fire fighter, mayor, hired, elected





Goals/Objectives
Students will be able to -

Learning Activities/Instructional Strategies

Evidence of Learning
(Formative & Summative)


1. Identify community workers in the town.

2. Differentiate and explain the difference between safety workers and community helpers.

3. Assess which types of community workers are needed in different situations.

4. Distinguish between different methods used to appoint community workers.




1. Guide students through playing a game of “Community Worker Bingo”. Teacher calls out names of various community workers and safety helpers. Students identify them based on their uniform and equipment identified in their pictures.

2. Students brainstorm a list of people who help us in our community, and determine where they should be placed on a graphic organizer to sort the list into community helper or safety worker.

3. One group of students will role play a situation in which a community worker is needed. Another group of students must determine what services are needed and act them out.

4. Read Woodrow for President or a children’s book about elections. Guide class through discussion of which community workers are elected or hired based on their qualifications. Discuss what kind of training is required for certain positions.



1. Students complete a matching activity to connect the names of community workers (which may be read aloud by the teacher if necessary) with their pictures.

2. While the teacher writes the names of various community workers in the appropriate columns, students will cut and paste pictures onto a matching graphic organizer.

3. Provide students with pictures of situations requiring a community worker (i.e. overflowing garbage cans, a house fire). Students label each picture with the appropriate name provided in a work bank.

4. Students will write a paragraph to present orally to the class defending why they should be elected mayor of South Plainfield.




Diverse Learners (ELL, Special Ed, Gifted & Talented)- Differentiation strategies may include, but are not limited to, learning centers and cooperative learning activities in either heterogeneous or homogeneous groups, depending on the learning objectives and the number of students who need further support and scaffolding, versus those who need more challenge and enrichment. Modifications may also be made as they relate to the special needs of students in accordance with their Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) or 504 plans, or English Language Learners (ELL). These may include, but are not limited to, extended time, copies of class notes, refocusing strategies, preferred seating, study guides, and/or suggestions from special education or ELL teachers.


Resources - Silver Burdett Ginn Social Studies Book 1997, Weekly Reader (if available), children’s literature regarding elections





Unit 3

Content Area – Social Studies

Unit Title – Around the World

Target Course/Grade Level – Grade 1 Social Studies

Unit Summary/Rationale – During this unit, students will learn that people in other areas of the world lead lives very different from our own. They may live in different types of homes, eat different foods, wear different clothes, celebrate different events/holidays, etc. Much of this may be determined by what resources are available in the immediate area.

Interdisciplinary Connections – Language Arts, Science, Art

Technology Integration – Smart Board (if available), Projector (if available)

21st Century Themes –

Global Awareness, Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial Literacy



21st Century Skills

Creativity/Innovation, Critical Thinking/Problem Solving, Communication and Collaboration




Learning Targets

Standard(s) – 6.1 U.S. History: America in the World:

All students will acquire the knowledge and skills to think analytically about how past and present interactions of people, cultures, and the environment shape the American heritage. Such knowledge and skills enable students to make informed decisions that reflect fundamental rights and core democratic values as productive citizens in local, national, and global communities.



Strand(s) – A. Civics, Government, and Human Rights

Content Statement(s) –

The world is comprised of nations that are similar to and different from the United States.



Cumulative Progress Indicator(s) (CPI) –

6.1.4. A.14: Describe how the world is divided into many nations that have their own governments, languages, customs, and laws.

Strand(s) - C. Economics, Innovation, and Technology

Content Statement(s) –

Availability of resources affects economic outcomes.



Cumulative Progress Indicator(s) (CPI) –

6.1.4. C.9: Compare and contrast how access to and use of resources affects people across the world differently.


Unit Essential Questions

  • How is life different in other parts of the world?

  • How have people in other parts of the world adapted to their environments?




Unit Enduring Understandings

  • People in different countries eat, live, and dress differently from Americans. This may be due to economic or environmental factors.

  • People around the world use available resources to build homes, grow food, and make clothing.

Terminology: culture, resources, environment





Goals/Objectives
Students will be able to -

Learning Activities/Instructional Strategies

Evidence of Learning
(Formative & Summative)


1. Examine what types of resources are available in different parts of the world, based on photos of various areas.

2. Deduce what types of homes can be constructed in different parts of the world, based on available resources.

3. Analyze the effects that varying amounts of rainfall can have on crops.

4. Participate in an activity from another culture.




1. After viewing pictures of various places around the world, students compare and contrast similarities and differences between their hometown and the other locations. Students discuss, in small groups, how life would be different for people who live in those areas.

2. Provide groups of students with varied materials. Groups use the provided materials to construct a home. Compare and contrast the results of each group’s construction.

3. Small groups of students work together to raise three separate plants (i.e. green beans). One plant will be over-watered, one will be under-watered, and one will be watered appropriately. Students keep a journal/log of how each plant responds.

4. Students will play “Down, Down, Down”, an Australian children’s game. Instructions can be found at http://www.ehow.com/list_6331992_traditional-children_s-games-australia.html




1 Students illustrate available resources in their own area, as well as available resources in another part of the world (i.e. Australian Outback).

2 Students write a paragraph to explain why each group’s buildings were different, and explain how this shows the differences in homes around the world.

3 Pair-share to discuss how rainfall affects the availability of different crops in different areas.

4 Students choose a children’s game that is common in their own area, and write a paragraph to explain the rules of the game to a child from Australia.




Diverse Learners (ELL, Special Ed, Gifted & Talented)- Differentiation strategies may include, but are not limited to, learning centers and cooperative learning activities in either heterogeneous or homogeneous groups, depending on the learning objectives and the number of students who need further support and scaffolding, versus those who need more challenge and enrichment. Modifications may also be made as they relate to the special needs of students in accordance with their Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) or 504 plans, or English Language Learners (ELL). These may include, but are not limited to, extended time, copies of class notes, refocusing strategies, preferred seating, study guides, and/or suggestions from special education or ELL teachers.


Resources - Silver Burdett Ginn Social Studies Book 1997, Weekly Reader (if available), http://www.ehow.com/list_6331992_traditional-children_s-games-australia.html





Unit 4

Content Area – Social Studies

Unit Title – The United States and Map Skills

Target Course/Grade Level – Grade 1 Social Studies

Unit Summary/Rationale – During this unit, students will learn that maps are documents that use symbols to show a specific area. This can be an area as small as a room, or as broad as the world. Maps can help us learn about areas of the world, including New Jersey and the United States where we live. Maps can show specific geographic characteristics (mountain ranges, rivers, deserts, etc.), as well as geographic locations (cities, capitals, etc.).


Interdisciplinary Connections – Language Arts, Science, Art

Technology Integration – Smart Board (if available), Projector (if available)

21st Century Themes –

Global Awareness



21st Century Skills

Creativity/Innovation, Critical Thinking/Problem Solving, Communication and Collaboration, Life & Career Skills




Learning Targets

Standard(s) – 6.1 U.S. History: America in the World:

All students will acquire the knowledge and skills to think analytically about how past and present interactions of people, cultures, and the environment shape the American heritage. Such knowledge and skills enable students to make informed decisions that reflect fundamental rights and core democratic values as productive citizens in local, national, and global communities.



Strand(s) – B. Geography, People, and the Environment

Content Statement(s) –

Spatial thinking and geographic tools can be used to describe and analyze the spatial patterns and organization of people, places, and environments on Earth.



Cumulative Progress Indicator(s) (CPI) –

6.1.4. B.1: Compare and contrast information that can be found on different types of maps, and determine when the information may be useful.


Unit Essential Questions

  • How can maps help us learn about an area?

  • How are different geographic characteristics and/or locations represented on a map?

  • How can maps help us compare the area where we live to other areas within the United States?




Unit Enduring Understandings

  • Maps can show us where different geographic features are located. They can also show us where cities and states can be found.

  • Maps use symbols to represent landforms, cities, and other important information (i.e. railroad tracks).

  • By looking at a map, we can see what areas have similar characteristics when compared to the area we live in.




Terminology: map, symbol, capital, landform, Hudson River, Delaware River, Atlantic Ocean, Trenton, Newark, Atlantic City





Goals/Objectives
Students will be able to -

Learning Activities/Instructional Strategies

Evidence of Learning
(Formative & Summative)


1. Recognize that a map is a document which uses symbols to relay information about an area.

2. Hypothesize why certain symbols are used.

2a Identify features that can be shown on a map.

3. Interpret a map of New Jersey to identify which geographic features can be found here.

4. Interpret a map of the United States to identify which geographic features can be found here.


1. Students draw a map of our classroom, using the symbols provided, to represent objects in the classroom.

2. Brainstorm ideas about what given symbols on a map represent. Students then work in small groups to create their own symbols for certain geographic features.

2a Students will look at a map and determine which features are being portrayed. Provided with a list of features, students will then circle the ones that are shown on the map.

3. Students find answers to questions about New Jersey on a map. Questions will include; What rivers border New Jersey? What ocean is on the coast of New Jersey? What is the capital city of New Jersey? What are some of the large cities in New Jersey?

4. Students compare maps of New Jersey and the United States to identify features found in New Jersey that can be found in other areas of the country (rivers, oceans, capital cities), as well as features found in the United States but not in New Jersey (mountain ranges, deserts, etc.).


1. Students trade maps with a partner, and write a sentence telling the location of an object in the classroom, based on the map drawn by their partner.

2. Students will identify different rooms in the school based on the symbols used in drawing a map of each room.

3. Students ask a partner to locate specific features on a map of New Jersey, such as the Delaware or Hudson Rivers, the Atlantic Ocean, Trenton, Atlantic City, Newark, etc.

4. Students write a paragraph choosing a geographic feature in the United States that they would like to visit, and defending why.




Diverse Learners (ELL, Special Ed, Gifted & Talented)- Differentiation strategies may include, but are not limited to, learning centers and cooperative learning activities in either heterogeneous or homogeneous groups, depending on the learning objectives and the number of students who need further support and scaffolding, versus those who need more challenge and enrichment. Modifications may also be made as they relate to the special needs of students in accordance with their Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) or 504 plans, or English Language Learners (ELL). These may include, but are not limited to, extended time, copies of class notes, refocusing strategies, preferred seating, study guides, and/or suggestions from special education or ELL teachers.


Resources - Silver Burdett Ginn Social Studies Book 1997, Weekly Reader (if available)





Unit 5

Content Area – Social Studies

Unit Title – Celebrations of People, Cultures, and Events

Target Course/Grade Level – Grade 1 Social Studies

Unit Summary/Rationale – During this unit, students will learn that people in the United States celebrate many different occasions for various reasons. Celebrations may honor people in history (i.e. Martin Luther King, Jr. U.S. Presidents, etc.), events from other cultures around the world (i.e. St. Patrick’s Day, Chinese New Year, etc.), or influential events in our nation’s past (i.e. Thanksgiving, Independence Day, etc.). It is important that we are respectful of all events celebrated in the United States, as we are a nation full of likenesses and differences.


Interdisciplinary Connections -

Technology Integration – Smart Board (if available), Projector (if available)

21st Century Themes –

Global Awareness, Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial Literacy, Civic Literacy, Health Literacy and Environmental Literacy




21st Century Skills

Creativity/Innovation, Critical Thinking/Problem Solving, Communication and Collaboration, Life & Career Skills, Technology, Media and Technology Skills





Learning Targets

Standard(s) – 6.1 U.S. History: America in the World:

All students will acquire the knowledge and skills to think analytically about how past and present interactions of people, cultures, and the environment shape the American heritage. Such knowledge and skills enable students to make informed decisions that reflect fundamental rights and core democratic values as productive citizens in local, national, and global communities.



Strand(s) – D. History, Culture, and Perspectives

Content Statement(s)

There are many different cultures within the classroom and community.



Cumulative Progress Indicator(s) (CPI) –

6.1. P.D.4: Learn about and respect other cultures within the classroom and community.

Content Statement(s)

Historical symbols and the ideas and events they represent play a role in understanding and evaluating our history.



Cumulative Progress Indicator(s) (CPI) –

6.1.4. D.17: Explain the role of historical symbols, monuments, and holidays and how they affect the American identity.


Unit Essential Questions

  • Why do we observe holidays?

  • How can we celebrate our likenesses and differences as individuals?

  • How do different cultures celebrate their traditions?




Unit Enduring Understandings

  • We celebrate individuals, historical events, and traditions of various cultures.

  • We honor individuals in order to celebrate our likenesses and differences. We can celebrate individuals through birthdays, a student of the week program, show and tell, personal accomplishments, etc.

  • Different cultures celebrate their traditions by calling on customs from the original celebrations of their ancestors.




Terminology: culture, differences, traditions, ancestors, heritage





Goals/Objectives
Students will be able to -

Learning Activities/Instructional Strategies

Evidence of Learning
(Formative & Summative)


1. Describe how prejudice and discrimination can be obstacles to understanding other cultures.

2. Explore and cite reasons for observing special days that recognize celebrated individuals.

3. Trace the historical foundations of traditions of various neighborhoods and communities.

4. Recognize and describe historical events associated with national holidays.




1. Separate students into two groups by a specific characteristic (i.e. eye color, hair color, gender, etc.). Allow one group special treatment (i.e. allowing them to choose an activity while everyone else is assigned one). Regroup students based on another characteristic and repeat special treatment. Lead students through a discussion about how it felt to be segregated and treated differently based on a physical characteristic.

2. Research famous historical figures from diverse backgrounds (i.e., Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.). By exploring a variety of texts (children’s literature, magazines, video clips, etc.), identify characteristics and accomplishments of the individual that are celebrated and remembered.

3. Conduct a class research project on the history of South Plainfield, highlighting important community traditions. Compare and contrast the communities and traditions, then and now.

4. Read literature and use websites to learn about American holidays. Discuss traditions of various holidays (i.e., Thanksgiving, religious holidays, Fourth of July) and explore the origins and historical relevance of these holidays.



1. Students write a paragraph or draw an illustration explaining how it felt to be treated differently and why it is important to treat all individuals the same.

2. Students create a poster describing the historical figure that acknowledges his/her accomplishments, and gives reasons for celebrating this person.

3. Students create a Venn Diagram or t-chart comparing South Plainfield’s past and present communities and traditions, and give possible reasons for the changes.

4. Students make a timeline of American holidays that occur during the year and indicate why they are celebrated.



Diverse Learners (ELL, Special Ed, Gifted & Talented)- Differentiation strategies may include, but are not limited to, learning centers and cooperative learning activities in either heterogeneous or homogeneous groups, depending on the learning objectives and the number of students who need further support and scaffolding, versus those who need more challenge and enrichment. Modifications may also be made as they relate to the special needs of students in accordance with their Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) or 504 plans, or English Language Learners (ELL). These may include, but are not limited to, extended time, copies of class notes, refocusing strategies, preferred seating, study guides, and/or suggestions from special education or ELL teachers.


Resources - Silver Burdett Ginn Social Studies Book 1997, Weekly Reader (if available)





Download 402.47 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©hozir.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling

    Bosh sahifa
davlat universiteti
ta’lim vazirligi
O’zbekiston respublikasi
maxsus ta’lim
zbekiston respublikasi
o’rta maxsus
davlat pedagogika
axborot texnologiyalari
nomidagi toshkent
pedagogika instituti
texnologiyalari universiteti
navoiy nomidagi
samarqand davlat
guruh talabasi
ta’limi vazirligi
nomidagi samarqand
toshkent axborot
toshkent davlat
haqida tushuncha
Darsning maqsadi
xorazmiy nomidagi
Toshkent davlat
vazirligi toshkent
tashkil etish
Alisher navoiy
Ўзбекистон республикаси
rivojlantirish vazirligi
matematika fakulteti
pedagogika universiteti
таълим вазирлиги
sinflar uchun
Nizomiy nomidagi
tibbiyot akademiyasi
maxsus ta'lim
ta'lim vazirligi
махсус таълим
bilan ishlash
o’rta ta’lim
fanlar fakulteti
Referat mavzu
Navoiy davlat
umumiy o’rta
haqida umumiy
Buxoro davlat
fanining predmeti
fizika matematika
universiteti fizika
malakasini oshirish
kommunikatsiyalarini rivojlantirish
davlat sharqshunoslik
jizzax davlat