Pearson Edexcel as and a level in History Scheme of work



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Pearson

Edexcel AS and A Level

in History



Scheme of work

Paper 3 Option 30: Lancastrians, Yorkists and Henry VII, 1399–1509



Introduction

Introduction

This document provides a sample scheme of work for Paper 3, Option 30: Lancastrians, Yorkists and Henry VII, 1399–1509 that should be adapted by centres to fit their timetabling and staffing arrangements. It is meant as an example approach only and is not intended to be prescriptive.

The scheme assumes 19 teaching weeks for Paper 3. Centres may choose to teach Paper 3 in Year 12, to start Paper 3 at the end of Year 12, to teach Paper 3 at the start of Year 13 or to teach it after the coursework has been completed. The separate course planner document provides a range of examples of delivery options that can be used for planning alongside this document.

Two possible approaches to delivering Paper 3 are given below, one which starts with a broad overview of the topic and covers the themes, before returning to look at the aspects in depth; and one which does the aspects in depth first then returns to do an overview of the period using the themes. Departments will decide which approach works best for them.



Breadth then depth

This approach begins with a broad overview of the topic. It covers all the main themes first so that students can contextualise the later depth topics. It then returns and looks at the different aspects in depth.



Week

Topic

Content

Suggested resources

1

Introductions

Introduction to Paper 3, including explanation of the division into Breadth and Depth aspects.

The background and context to the topic.

Brief overview of the period covered in this topic.


Overview from Topic booklet for this option.

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509 (Access to History, Hodder, 2010), introduction on fifteenth-century England.



2

Breadth 1 Changing relationships between crown and the nobility: ‘overmighty subjects’

Introduction to Breadth themes.

Major landowners and their role in governing the kingdom,


1399–1509:

  • lands, offices of state and church patronage;

  • necessary props to the crown but potential rivals (key developments: the crushing of the conspiracy against Henry V in 1415, the execution of Warwick in 1499).

Maurice Keen, England in the Later Middle Ages (Routledge, 2003).

3

Breadth 1 continued

The importance of retaining, 1399–1509:

  • livery and maintenance;

  • the concept of 'bastard feudalism' (key developments: statutes in 1468 and 1504 against retaining).

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509.

Colin Pendrill, The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: England 1459–c1513 (Heinemann Advanced History, Heinemann, 2004).



4

Breadth 1 continued

Coping with challenge – disorder and local rivalries, 1399–1509:

  • Neville versus Percy in the north, Bonville versus Courteney in the south west, the experience of the Pastons in East Anglia (key developments: the readeption of Edward IV in 1471 and increased control of the localities in the 1470s).

Ian Dawson, The Wars of the Roses (Enquiring History Series, Hodder, 2012).

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509.



5

Breadth 2
Changes in the sinews of power

Royal income, 1399–1509:

  • land, custom duties, feudal rights, profits of justice, taxation;

  • the roles of the Exchequer and the Chamber.

The role of parliament, 1399–1509:

  • prop or curb to royal power? (key development: the Parliament of 1406).

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509.

Colin Pendrill, The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: England 1459–c1513.



6

Breadth 2 continued

War and diplomacy, 1399–1509:

  • benefits and cost to the crown (key developments: the losses in France in 1453, the Treaty of Picquigny 1475, the Spanish Marriage 1499).

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509.

Colin Pendrill, The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: England 1459–c1513.



7

Depth 1
The crises of 1399–1405

Introduction to Depth aspects.

The crisis of 1399:



  • reasons for Bolingbroke's seizure of the crown from Richard II.

Henry IV and the problems arising from his behaviour in 1399:



  • the first stirrings of revolt and the death of Richard in 1400.

Nigel Saul, Richard II: Author of his own Downfall?, History Today, Volume 49, Issue 9, 1999.

Richard Cavendish, Death of John of Gaunt, History Today, Volume 49, Issue 2, 1999.

Caroline M Barron, The Art of Kingship: Richard II, 1377–1399, History Today, Volume 35, Issue 6, 1985.

Alan Rogers, Henry IV and the Revolt of the Earls, 1400, History Today, Volume 18, Issue 4, 1968.



8

Depth 1 continued


Surviving rebellion, 1403–05:

  • the challenges from the Percys and Owain Glyndwr and reasons for Henry IV’s survival;

  • the influence of relations with Scotland and France.

A L Rowse, The Reign of Henry IV, Part I, History Today, Volume 16, Issue 9, 1966.

Alastair Dunn, A Kingdom in Crisis: Henry IV and the Battle of Shrewsbury, History Today, Volume 53, Issue 8, 2003.

Richard Cavendish, Owen Glendower’s French Treaty, History Today, Volume 54, Issue 6.



9

Depth 2
Henry V and the conquest of France,
1413–21

The significance of renewing the war with France and the campaign of 1415.

The significance of the challenge from Lollardy and the royal response.



Maurice Keen, England in the Later Middle Ages.

John Matusiak, Henry V (Routledge, 2012).

HA resource on Henry V: www.history.org.uk/resources/general_resource_7958_69.html


10

Depth 2 continued

  • The importance of the Burgundian Alliance 1419;

  • the significance of the conquest of Normandy and the Treaty of Troyes, 1417–20: the basis, impact and cost of success.

11

Depth 3 Renewed crises and challenges, c1449–61

  • The personalities of Henry VI and Margaret of Anjou and the effects on the governing of England, 1449–61;

  • downfall of the Duke of Suffolk in 1449.

Andrew Pickering, Lancastrians to Tudors: England 1450–1509 (Cambridge Perspectives in History, Cambridge University Press, 2000), chapter 1.

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509, chapter 2.



12

Depth 3 continued

The reasons for, events, and significance of, Cade's rebellion 1450.

The importance of the Duke of York's protectorate and his growing ambitions, 1454–60.



Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509, chapter 2.

Ian Dawson, The Wars of the Roses, chapter 2.



13

Depth 3 continued

The Battle of Towton and the reasons for the triumph of Edward IV 1461: the importance of the Earl of Warwick.

Andrew Pickering, Lancastrians to Tudors: England 1450–1509, chapter 1.

Ian Dawson, The Wars of the Roses, chapters 3 and 4.

George Goodwin, The Battle of Towton: This Bitter Field, History Today, Volume 61, Issue 5, 2011.


14

Depth 4
The Yorkists divided,
1478–85

  • The reasons for the attainder and murder of George, Duke of Clarence in 1478;

  • tensions in the Yorkist camp and the impact of Edward's early death 1483.

Colin Pendrill, The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: England 1459–c1513, section 3.

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509, chapter 4.



15

Depth 4 continued

The challenges faced by Richard III:

  • the significance of his seizure of the throne 1483;

  • the disappearance of the princes in the Tower;

  • the Duke of Buckingham's rebellion;

  • his relative failures compared with Edward IV.

Colin Pendrill, The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: England 1459–c1513, section 4.

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509, chapter 5.

Andrew Pickering, Lancastrians to Tudors: England 1450–1509, chapter 3.


16

Depth 4 continued

Henry Tudor and the reasons for his success at the Battle of Bosworth Field: foreign aid and the role of the Stanleys.

17

Depth 5
Henry VII: seizing the throne and trying to keep it, 1485–97

  • Claiming the throne and the significance of the marriage to Elizabeth of York;

  • living in fear and striving for security: the use spies and bonds.




Colin Pendrill, The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: England 1459–c1513, section 5.

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509, chapter 6.

Andrew Pickering, Lancastrians to Tudors: England 1450–1509, chapter 5.


18

Depth 5 continued

Challengers and their supporters:

  • Lambert Simnel and the Earl of Lincoln;

  • Perkin Warbeck and Sir William Stanley;

  • the importance of Margaret of Burgundy.

19

Depth 5 continued

Resistance to taxation: causes, events and impact of the Yorkshire Rebellion 1489 and the Cornish Rebellion 1497.

Depth then breadth

This approach begins with the depth topics. With this approach, students gain a detailed understanding of those episodes before looking at the broad sweep of the themes over the period.



Week

Topic

Content

Suggested resources

1

Introductions

Introduction to Paper 3, including explanation of the division into Breadth and Depth aspects.

The background and context to the topic.

Brief overview of the period covered in this topic.


Overview from Topic booklet for this option.

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509 (Access to History, Hodder, 2010), introduction on fifteenth-century England.



2

Depth 1
The crises of 1399–1405

Introduction to Depth aspects.

The crisis of 1399:



  • reasons for Bolingbroke's seizure of the crown from Richard II.

Henry IV and the problems arising from his behaviour in 1399:



  • the first stirrings of revolt and the death of Richard in 1400.

Nigel Saul, Richard II: Author of his own Downfall?, History Today, Volume 49, Issue 9, 1999.

Richard Cavendish, Death of John of Gaunt, History Today, Volume 49, Issue 2, 1999.

Caroline M Barron, The Art of Kingship: Richard II, 1377–1399, History Today, Volume 35, Issue 6, 1985.

Alan Rogers, Henry IV and the Revolt of the Earls, 1400, History Today, Volume 18, Issue 4, 1968.



3

Depth 1 continued


Surviving rebellion, 1403–05:

  • the challenges from the Percys and Owain Glyndwr and reasons for Henry IV’s survival;

  • the influence of relations with Scotland and France.

A L Rowse, The Reign of Henry IV, Part I, History Today, Volume 16, Issue 9, 1966.

Alastair Dunn, A Kingdom in Crisis: Henry IV and the Battle of Shrewsbury, History Today, Volume 53, Issue 8, 2003.

Richard Cavendish, Owen Glendower’s French Treaty, History Today, Volume 54, Issue 6.



4

Depth 2
Henry V and the conquest of France, 1413–21

The significance of renewing the war with France and the campaign of 1415.

The significance of the challenge from Lollardy and the royal response.



Maurice Keen, England in the Later Middle Ages (Routledge, 2003).

John Matusiak, Henry V (Routledge, 2012).

HA resource on Henry V: www.history.org.uk/resources/general_resource_7958_69.html


5

Depth 2 continued

The importance of the Burgundian Alliance 1419;

  • the significance of the conquest of Normandy and the Treaty of Troyes, 1417–20: the basis, impact and cost of success.

6

Depth 3 Renewed crises and challenges, c1449–61


  • The personalities of Henry VI and Margaret of Anjou and the effects on the governing of England, 1449–61;

  • downfall of the Duke of Suffolk in 1449.




Andrew Pickering, Lancastrians to Tudors: England 1450–1509 (Cambridge Perspectives in History, Cambridge University Press, 2000), chapter 1.

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509, chapter 2.



7

Depth 3 continued

The reasons for, events, and significance of, Cade's rebellion 1450.

The importance of the Duke of York's protectorate and his growing ambitions, 1454–60.



Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509, chapter 2.

Ian Dawson, The Wars of the Roses (Enquiring History, Hodder, 2012), chapter 2.



8

Depth 3 continued

The Battle of Towton and the reasons for the triumph of Edward IV 1461: the importance of the Earl of Warwick.

Andrew Pickering, Lancastrians to Tudors: England 1450–1509, chapter 1.

Ian Dawson, The Wars of the Roses, chapters 3 and 4.

George Goodwin, The Battle of Towton: This Bitter Field, History Today, Volume 61, Issue 5, 2011.


9

Depth 4
The Yorkists divided,
1478–85


  • The reasons for the attainder and murder of George, Duke of Clarence in 1478;

  • tensions in the Yorkist camp and the impact of Edward's early death 1483.

Colin Pendrill, The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: England 1459–c1513 (Heinemann Advanced History, 2004), section 3.

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509, chapter 4.



10

Depth 4 continued

The challenges faced by Richard III:

  • the significance of his seizure of the throne 1483;

  • the disappearance of the princes in the Tower;

  • the Duke of Buckingham's rebellion;

  • his relative failures compared with Edward IV.

Colin Pendrill, The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: England 1459–c1513, section 4.

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509, chapter 5.

Andrew Pickering, Lancastrians to Tudors: England 1450–1509, chapter 3.


11

Depth 4 continued

Henry Tudor and the reasons for his success at the Battle of Bosworth Field: foreign aid and the role of the Stanleys.

12

Depth 5
Henry VII: seizing the throne and trying to keep it, 1485–97

Claiming the throne and the significance of the marriage to Elizabeth of York; living in fear and striving for security: the use spies and bonds.

Colin Pendrill, The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: England 1459–c1513, section 5.

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509, chapter 6.

Andrew Pickering, Lancastrians to Tudors: England 1450–1509, chapter 5.


13

Depth 5 continued

Challengers and their supporters:

  • Lambert Simnel and the Earl of Lincoln;

  • Perkin Warbeck and Sir William Stanley;

  • the importance of Margaret of Burgundy.

14

Depth 5 continued

Resistance to taxation: causes, events and impact of the Yorkshire Rebellion 1489 and the Cornish Rebellion 1497.

15

Breadth 1 Changing relationships between crown and the nobility: 'overmighty subjects'

Introduction to Breadth themes.

Major landowners and their role in governing the kingdom, 1399–1509:



  • lands, offices of state and church patronage;

  • necessary props to the crown but potential rivals (key developments: the crushing of the conspiracy against Henry V in 1415, the execution of Warwick in 1499).

Maurice Keen, England in the Later Middle Ages.

16

Breadth 1 continued

The importance of retaining, 1399–1509:

  • livery and maintenance;

  • the concept of 'bastard feudalism' (key developments statutes in 1468 and 1504 against retaining).

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509.

Colin Pendrill, The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: England 1459–c1513.



17

Breadth 1 continued

Coping with challenge – disorder and local rivalries, 1399–1509:

  • Neville versus Percy in the north, Bonville versus Courteney in the south west, the experience of the Pastons in East Anglia (key developments; the readeption of Edward IV in 1471 and increased control of the localities in the 1470s).

Ian Dawson, The Wars of the Roses.

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509.



18

Breadth 2 Changes in the sinews of power

Royal income, 1399–1509:

  • land, custom duties, feudal rights, profits of justice, taxation;

  • the roles of the Exchequer and the Chamber.

The role of parliament, 1399–1509:

  • prop or curb to royal power? (key development: the Parliament of 1406).

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509.

Colin Pendrill, The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: England 1459–c1513.



19

Breadth 2 continued

War and diplomacy, 1399–1509:

  • benefits and cost to the crown (key developments: the losses in France in 1453, the Treaty of Picquigny 1475, the Spanish Marriage 1499).

Roger Turvey, Access to History: The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: Britain 1450–1509.

Colin Pendrill, The Wars of the Roses and Henry VII: England 1459–c1513.










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