Bibliography on intellectual history methodologies



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BIBLIOGRAPHY ON INTELLECTUAL HISTORY METHODOLOGIES

Compiled by Mikkel Thorup (August 2013)

Please feel free to circulate.

Any corrections or suggestions to the list can be made to idemt@hum.au.dk.



The principle for inclusion on the list is texts dealing with methodological aspects of intellectual history and/or intellectual historians. The principle of presentation is chronology.

Journals

  • Lychnos. An annual for history of ideas and science, 1936-

  • Journal of the History of Ideas, 1940-

  • Intellectual History Newsletter, 1979-2002

  • History of European Ideas, 1980-

  • Slagmark – tidsskrift for idéhistorie, 1983-

  • ARR, 1989-

  • Intellectual History Review, 1996-

  • The European Legacy, 1996-

  • Redescriptions, 1997-

  • History of Intellectual Culture, 2001-

  • Partial Answers. Journal of Literature and the History of Ideas, 2003-

  • Modern Intellectual History, 2004-

  • Contributions, 2005-

  • Ideas in History, 2006-

  • Zeitschrift für Ideengeschichte, 2007-

  • Journal of Interdisciplinary History of Ideas, 2012-

Literature

  • Arthur O. Lovejoy, The Great Chain of Being. A Study of the History of an Idea, Cambridge, Mass. & London: Harvard University Press 1936

  • Arthur O. Lovejoy, “The Historiography of Ideas”, Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, vol. 78, no. 4, 1938, pp. 529-543

  • R.G. Collingwood, An Autobiography, Oxford: Oxford University Press

  • Arthur O. Lovejoy, “Reflections on the History of Ideas”, Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 1, no. 1, 1940, pp. 3-23

  • R.G. Collingwood, The Idea of History, Oxford: Oxford University Press 1946

  • Franklin L. Baumer, “Intellectual History and its Problems”, Journal of Modern History, vol. 21, no. 3, 1949, pp. 191-203

  • John Higham, “The Rise of American Intellectual History”, American Historical Review, April, 1951, pp. 453-471

  • George Boas et.al., Studies in Intellectual History, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press 1953

  • Peter Laslett, “Introduction”, in John Locke, Two Treatises of Government, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1960

  • Crane Brinton, “Introduction”, in Brinton, Ideas and Men. The Story of Western Thought, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall 1963, 2. ed.

  • Maurice Mandelbaum, “The History of Ideas, Intellectual History, and the History of Philosophy”, History and Theory, 1965, pp. 33-66

  • R.S. Crane, “Philosophy, Literature, and the History of Ideas”, in Crane, The Idea of the Humanities and other Essays Critical and Historical, vol. 1, Chicago & London: University of Chicago Press 1967

  • Peter Gay, “The Social History of Ideas: Ernst Cassirer and After”, in Kurt H. Wolff & Barrington Moore (eds.), The Critical Spirit. Essays in Honor of Herbert Marcuse, Boston: Beacon Press 1967

  • Louis O. Mink, “Change and Causality in the History of Ideas”, Eighteenth-Century Studies, 1968, pp. 7-25

  • Johannes Sløk, Hvad er idehistorie? Et programskrift, København: Gyldendal 1968

  • John Dunn, “The Identity of the History of Ideas”, Philosophy, April 1968, pp. 85-103

  • Johannes Sløk, Fylde eller tomhed, København: Gyldendal 1968

  • Georg Boas, The History of ideas. An Introduction, New York: Charles Schribner’s Sons

  • Klaus von Beyme, Politische Ideengeschichte. Probleme eines interdisziplinären Forschungsbereiches, Tübingen: J.C.B. Mohr (Paul Siebeck) 1969

  • John Higham, “Part II: Polarities in Intellectual History, chap. 2. Intellectual History and its Neighbors; 3. The Study of American Intellectual History”, in Higham, Writing American History. Essays on Modern Scholarship, Bloomington & London: Indiana University Press 1970

  • Felix Gilbert, “Intellectual History: Its Aims and Methods”, in Gilbert & Stephen R. Graubard (eds.), Historical Studies Today, New York: W.W. Norton & Co 1972

  • Reinhart Koselleck, “Einleitung”, in Otto Brunner, Werner Conze & Reinhart Koselleck (eds.), Geschichtliche Grundbegriffe. Historisches Lexicon zur politisch-sozialen Sprache in Deutschland, vol. 1, Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta 1972

  • Hayden White, The Historical Imagination in Nineteenth-Century Europe, Baltimore & London: Johns Hopkins University Press 1973

  • Philip P. Wiener, “Towards Commemorating the Centenary of Arthur O. Lovejoy’s Birthday (October 10, 1873)”, Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 34, no. 4, 1973, pp. 591-598

  • Philip P. Wiener, “Preface”, in Wiener (ed.), Dictionary of the History of Ideas, New York: Charles Schribner 1973

  • F. E. L. Priestly, “Mapping the World of Ideas. Review of the Dictionary of the History of Ideas”, Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 35, 1973, pp. 527-537

  • Gordon J. Schochet, “Quentin Skinner’s Method”, Political Theory, vol. 2, no. 3, 1974, pp. 261-276

  • Quentin Skinner, “Some Problems in the Analysis of Political Thought and Action”, Political Theory, vol. 2, no. 3, 1974, pp. 277-303

  • Masao Maruyama, Studies in the Intellectual History of Tokugawa Japan, Princeton University Press 1974 [1940-44], “Introduction”

  • Gerald Izenberg, “Psychohistory and Intellectual History”, History and Theory, vol. 14, 1975, pp. 139-155

  • Arnaldo Momigliano, “A Piedmontese View of the History of Ideas”, in Momigliano, Essays in Ancient and Modern Historiography, Oxford: Basil Blackwell 1977

  • Michel Foucault, “History of Systems of Thought”, in Donald F. Bouchard (ed.), Michel Foucault. Language, Counter-Memory, Practice. Selected Essays and Interviews, Ithaca & New York: Cornell University Press 1977

  • Sande Cohen, “Structuralism and the Writing of Intellectual History”, History and Theory, vol. 17, nr. 2, 1978, s. 175-206

  • Hayden White, Tropics of Discourse. Essays in Cultural Criticism, Baltimore & London: Johns Hopkins University Press 1978

  • Leonard Krieger, “The Autonomy of Intellectual History”, in Georg G. Iggers & Harold T. Parker (eds.), International Handbook of Historical Studies, Westport, Ct.: Metheuen 1979

  • John Higham & Paul K. Conkin (eds.), New Directions in American Intellectual History, Baltimore & London: Johns Hopkins University Press 1979

      • Laurence Veysey, “Intellectual History and the New Social History”

      • Gordon S. Wood, “Intellectual History and the Social Sciences”

      • David A. Hollinger, “Historians and the Discourse of Intellectuals”

      • Rush Welter, On Studying the National Mind”

      • Sacvan Bercovitch, “New England’s Errand Reappraised”

      • Henry F. May, “Intellectual History and Religious History”

      • Dorothy Ross, “The Liberal Tradition Revisited and the Republican Tradition Addressed”

      • Thomas L. Haskell, “Deterministic Implications of Intellectual History”

      • Murray G. Murphey, “The Place of Beliefs in Modern Culture”

      • David D. Hall, “The World of Print and Collective Mentality in Seventeenth-Century New England”

      • Thomas Bender, “The Cultures of Intellectual Life: The City and the Professions”

      • Neil Harris, “Iconography and Intellectual History: the Half-Tone Effect”

      • Warren I. Susman, “’Personality’ and the Making of Twentieth-Century Culture”

  • John Dunn, “The Identity of the History of Ideas”, in Dunn, Political Obligation in its Historical Context. Essays in Political Theory, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1980

  • Daniel J. Wilson, Arthur O. Lovejoy and the Quest for Intelligibility, N.C: Chapel Hill 1980

  • Robert Darnton, “Intellectual and Cultural History”, chap. 14 in Michael Kammen (ed.), The Past Before Us. Contemporary Historical Writing in the United States, Ithaca & London: Cornell University Press 1980

  • William J. Bouwsma, “Intellectual History in the 1980s: From the History of Ideas to the History of Meaning”, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, vol. 12, no. 2, 1981, pp. 279-291

  • J.G.A. Pocock, “The Reconstruction of Discourse: Towards the Historiography of Political Thought”, Modern Language Notes, vol. 96, no. 5, 1981, pp. 959-980

  • Michel Foucault, “The Order of Discourse”, in Robert Young (ed.), Untying the Text: A Post-Structuralist Reader, Boston, London & Henley: Routledge & Kegan Pail 1981

  • Joel Colton, “Intellectual History in the 1980s: The Case for the Defense”, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, vol. 12, no. 2, 1981, pp. 293-298

  • J.G.A. Pocock, “Afterword: The Machiavellian Moment Revisited: A Study in History and Ideology”, Journal of Modern History, vol. 53, 1981, pp. 49-72

  • Ernst Schulin, “German ‘Geistesgeschichte’, American ‘Intellectual History’ and French ‘Historie des Mentalités’ since 1900. A Comparison”, History of European Ideas, vol. 1, no. 3, 1981, pp. 195-214

  • Dominick LaCapra & Steven L. Kaplan (eds.), Modern European Intellectual History. Reappraisals and New Perspectives, Ithaca & London: Cornell University Press 1982

      • Roger Chartier, “Intellectual History or Sociocultural History? The French Trajectories”

      • Dominick LaCapra, “Rethinking Intellectual History and Reading Texts”

      • Martin Jay, “Should Intellectual History Take a Linguistic Turn? Reflections on the Habermas-Gadamer Debate”

      • Hans Kellner, “Triangular Anxieties: The Present State of European Intellectual History”

      • Mark Poster, “The Future According to Foucault: The Archeology of Knowledge and Intellectual History”

      • E.M. Henning, “Archeology, Deconstruction, and Intellectual History”

      • Keith Michael Baker, “On the Problem of the Ideological Origins of the French Revolution”

      • Peter Jelavich, “Popular Dimensions of Modernist Elite Culture: The Case of Theater in Fin-de-Siècle Munich”

      • David James Fisher, “Reading Freud’s Civilization and Its Discontents”

      • Hayden White, “Method and Ideology in Intellectual History: The Case of Henry Adams”

  • Dominick LaCapra, Rethinking Intellectual History. Texts, Contexts, Language, Ithaca & London: Cornell University Press 1983

  • Dominick LaCapra, “Intellectual History and Defining the Present as ‘Postmodern’”, in Ihab Hassan & Sally Hassan (eds.), Innovation/Renovation. New Perspectives on the Humanities, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press 1983

  • Stefano Collini, Donald Winch & John Burrow, “The Governing Science: Things Political and the Intellectual Historian”, in Collini, Winch & Burrow, That Noble Science of Politics. A Study in Nineteenth-Century Intellectual History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1983

  • Preston King (ed.), The History of Ideas. An Introduction to Method, London & Canberra: Croom Helm 1983

      • Preston King, “Introduction”

      • Preston King, “Thinking Past a Problem”

      • Michael Oakeshott, “The Activity of Being an Historian”

      • Preston King, “Michael Oakeshott and Historical Particularism”

      • R.G. Collingwood, “The Historical Logic of Question and Answer”

      • Leo Strauss, “On Collingwood’s Philosophy of History”

      • A.O. Lovejoy, “The Study of the History of Ideas”

      • Maurice Mandelbaum, “On Lovejoy’s Historiography”

      • Leo Strauss, “Political Philosophy and History”

      • John G. Gunnell, “The Myth of the Tradition”

      • Quentin Skinner, “Conventions and the Understanding of Speech Acts”

      • Preston King, “The Theory of Context and the Case of Hobbes”

  • John Patrick Diggins, “The Oyster and the Pearl: The Problem of Contextualism in Intellectual History”, History and Theory, vol. 23, no. 2, 1984, pp. 151-169

  • Iain Hampsher-Monk, “Political Languages in Time: The Work of J.G.A. Pocock”, British Journal of Political Science, vol. 14, 1984, pp. 159-174

  • Richard Rorty, “The Historiography of Philosophy: Four Genres”, in Rorty, J.B. Schneewind & Quentin Skinner, Philosophy in History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1984

  • Peter L. Janssen, “Political Thought as Traditionary Action: The Critical Response to Skinner and Pocock”, History and Theory, vol. 24, 1985, pp. 115-146

  • David Boucher, Texts in Context. Revisionist Methods for Studying the History of Ideas, Dordrecht: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1985

  • Conal Condren, The Study and Appraisal of Classic Texts. An Essay on Political Theory, Its Inheritance, and the History of Ideas, Princeton: Princeton University Press 1985

  • Rolf Reichardt, “Einleitung”, in Reichardt & Eberhard Schmitt (eds.), Handbuch politisch-sozialer Grundbegriffe in Frankreich 1680-1820, München: R. Oldenbourg Verlag 1985

  • Michael Ermarth, “Mindful Matters: The Empire’s New Codes and the Plight of Modern European Intellectual History”, Journal of Modern History, vol. 57, no. 3, 1985, pp. 506-527

  • Stefano Collini, “What is Intellectual History?”, History Today, October 1985, pp. 46-48

  • Michael Biddiss , “What is Intellectual History?”, History Today, October 1985, pp. 49-50

  • Quentin Skinner, “What is Intellectual History?”, History Today, October 1985, pp. 50-52

  • J.G.A. Pocock, “What is Intellectual History?”, History Today, October 1985, pp. 52-53

  • Bruce Kuklick, “What is Intellectual History?”, History Today, October 1985, pp. 53

  • Michael Hunter, “What is Intellectual History?”, History Today, October 1985, pp. 53-54

  • J.G.A. Pocock, “Introduction: The State of the Art”, in Pocock, Virtue, Commerce, and History. Essays on Political Thought and History, Chiefly in the Eighteenth Century, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1985

  • David A. Hollinger, In the American Province. Studies in the History and Historiography of Ideas, Bloomington: Indiana University Press 1985

  • Reinhart Koselleck, “Sozialgeschichte und Begriffsgeschichte”, in Wolfgang Schieder & Volker Sellin (eds.), Sozialgeschichte in Deutschland, vol. 1, Göttingen: Vandenhoek & Ruprecht 1986

  • Melvin Richter, “History (Begriffsgeschichte) and Political Theory”, Political Theory, vol. 14, no. 4, 1986, pp. 604-637

  • Donald R. Kelley, “Horizons of Intellectual History: Retrospect, Circumspect, Prospect”, Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 48, no. 1, 1987, pp. 143-169

  • P. & m. Kuntz (eds.), The Great Chain of Being after Fifty Years, New York

  • Daniel J. Wilson, “Lovejoy’s The Great Chain of Being after Fifty Years”, Journal of the History of Ideas, 1987, pp. 187-205

  • Gladys Gordon-Bournique, “A.O. Lovejoy and the ‘History of Ideas’”, Journal of the History of Ideas, 1987, pp. 207-210

  • Edward P. Mahoney, “Lovejoy and the Hierarchy of Being”, Journal of the History of Ideas, 1987, pp. 211-230

  • Francis Oakley, “Lovejoy’s Unexplored Option”, Journal of the History of Ideas, 1987, pp. 231-245

  • John E. Toews, “Intellectual History after the Linguistic Turn: The Autonomy of Meaning and the Irreducibility of Experience”, American Historical Review, vol. 92, 1987, pp. 879-907

  • Hayden White, The Content of the Form. Narrative Discourse and Historical Representation, Baltimore & London: Johns Hopkins University Press 1987

  • Martin Jay, “Two Cheers for Paraphrase: The Confessions of a Synoptic Intellectual Historian”, in Jay, Fin de Siècle Socialism and other essays, New York & London: Routledge 1988

  • Anthony Pagden, “Rethinking the Linguistic Turn: Current Anxieties in Intellectual History”, Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 49, no. 3, 1988, pp. 519-529

  • Michel de Certeau, The Writing of History, New York: Columbia University Press 1988

  • Roger Chartier, Cultural History. Between Practices and Representations, Cambridge: Polity Press 1988

  • James Tully (ed.), Meaning and Context. Quentin Skinner and his Critics, Cambridge: Polity 1988

      • James Tully, “The Pen is a Mighty Sword: Quentin Skinner’s Analysis of Politics”

      • Quentin Skinner, “Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas”

      • Quentin Skinner, “Motives, Intentions and the Interpretation of Texts”

      • Quentin Skinner, “’Social Meaning’ and the Explanation of Social Action”

      • Quentin Skinner, “Some Problems in the Analysis of Political Thought and Action”

      • Quentin Skinner, “Language and Social Change”

      • Martin Hollis, “Say It with Flowers”

      • Keith Graham, “How do Illocutionary Descriptions Explain?”

      • Joseph V. Femia, “An Historicist Critique of ‘Revisionist’ Methods for Studying”

      • Kenneth Minogue, “Method in Intellectual History: Quentin Skinner’s Foundations”

      • Nathan Tarcov, “Quentin Skinner’s Method and Machiavelli’s Prince”

      • John Keane, “More Theses on the Philosophy of History”

      • Charles Taylor, “The Hermeneutics of Conflict”

      • Quentin Skinner, “A Reply to my Critics”

  • Reinhart Koselleck, “Linguistic Change and the History of Events”, Journal of Modern History, vol. 61, December 1989, pp. 649-666

  • Lloyd S. Kramer, “Literature, Criticism, and Historical Imagination: The Literary Challenge of Hayden White and Dominick LaCapra”, in Lynn Hunt (ed.), The New Cultural History, Berkeley: University of California Press 1989

  • Quentin Skinner, “Language and Political Change”, in Terence Ball, James Farr & Rusell L. Hansen (eds.), Political Innovation and Conceptual Change, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1989

  • James Farr, “Understanding Conceptual Change Politically” ”, in Terence Ball, James Farr & Rusell L. Hansen (eds.), Political Innovation and Conceptual Change, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1989

  • Dominick LaCapra, “Intellectual History and Critical Theory”, in LaCapra, Soundings in Critical Theory, Ithaca & London: Cornell University Press 1989

  • Kack Liveley & Andrew Reeve, “General Introduction”, in Liveley & Reeve (eds.), Modern Political Theory from Hobbes to Marx. Key Debates, London & New York: Routledge 1989

  • David Harlan, “Intellectual History and the Return of Literature”, American Historical Review, vol. 94, 1989, pp. 581-609

  • Keith Tribe, “The Geschichtliche Grundbegriffe Project: From History of Ideas to Conceptual History. A Review Article”, Comparative Studies in Society, vol. 31, 1989, pp. 180-184

  • Reinhart Koselleck, ”Social History and Conceptual History”, International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society, vol. 2, no. 3, 1990, pp. 308-325

  • Reinhart Koselleck, “Sprogændring og begivenhedshistorie”, Den jyske historiker, vol. 50, 1990, pp. 121-135

  • Robert Darnton, The Kiss of Lamourette. Reflections on Cultural History, New York & London: W.W. Norton & Co 1990

  • Lars-Henrik Schmidt, “Den interpreterende konstruktion”, Den Jyske Historiker, no. 50, 1990, pp. 55-64

  • Fritz Ringer, ”The Intellectual Field, Intellectual History, and the Sociology of Knowledge”, Theory & Society, vol. 19, 1990, pp. 269-294

  • Charles Lemert, “The Habits of Intellectuals. Response to Ringer”, Theory & Society, vol. 19, 1990, pp. 295-310

  • Martin Jay, “Fieldwork and Theorizing in Intellectual History. A Reply to Fritz Ringer”, Theory & Society, vol. 19, 1990, pp. 311-321

  • Fritz Ringer, “Rejoinder to Charles Lemert and Martin Jay”, Theory & Society, vol. 19, 1990, pp. 323-334

  • Melvin Richter, “Reconstructing the History of Political Languages: Pocock, Skinner, and the Geschichtliche Grundbegriffe”, History and Theory, vol. 29, no. 1, 1990, pp. 38-70

  • Donald R. Kelley, “What is Happening to the History of Ideas?”, Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 51, no. 1, 1990, pp. 3-25

  • Donald R. Kelley, The History of Ideas. Canon and Variations, Rochester: University of Rochester Press 1900

      • Donald R. Kelley, “Introduction: Reflections on a Canon”

      • Arthur O. Lovejoy, “Reflections on the History of Ideas”

      • Frederick J. Teggart, “A Problem in the History of Ideas”

      • Leo Spitzer, “Geistesgeschichte vs. History of Ideas as Apllied to Hitlerism”

      • Arthur O. Lovejoy, “Reply to Professor Spitzer”

      • Theodore Spencer, “Lovejoy’s ‘Essays in the History of Ideas’”

      • Arthur O. Lovejoy, “Historiography and Evaluation: A Disclaimer”

      • Abraham Edel, “Levels of Meaning and the History of Ideas”

      • Paul O. Kristeller, “The Philosophical Significance of the History of Thought”

      • Philip P. Wiener, “Logical Significance of the History of Thought”

      • Joseph Anthony Mazzeo, “Some Interpretations of the History of Ideas”

      • Leonard Krieger, “The Autonomy of Intellectual History”

      • Daniel J. Wilson, “Arthur O. Lovejoy and the Moral of ‘The Great Chain of Veing’”

      • Kathleen E. Duffin, “Arthur O. Lovejoy and the Emergence of Novelty”

      • Daniel J. Wilson, “Lovejoy’s ‘The Great Chain of Being’ after Fifty Years”

      • Edward P. Mahoney, “Lovejoy and the Hierarchy of Being”

      • Francis Oakley, “Lovejoy’s Unexplored Option”

      • Johann Huizinga, “History Changing Form”

      • Joseph Katz, “A Reply to J. Huizinga on the Form and Function of History”

      • Calvin G. Rand, “Two Meanings of Historicism in the Writings of Dilthey, Troeltsch, and Meinecke”

      • Nils B. Kvastad, “Semantics in the Methodology of the History of Ideas”

      • Paul O. Kristeller, “’Creativity’ and ‘Tradition’”

      • Lester G. Crocker, “Interpreting the Enlightenment: A Political Approach”

      • Patrick H. Hutton, “The Art of Memory Reconceived: From Rhetoric to Psychoanalysis”

      • Donald R. Kelley, “Horizons of Intellectual History: Retrospect, Circumspect, Prospect”

  • Richard Tuck, “History of Political Thought”, in Peter Burke (ed.), New Perspectives on Historical Writing, Cambridge: Polity Press 1991

  • Henry F. May, “Religion and American Intellectual History, 1945-1989: Reflections on an Uneasy Relationship”, chap. 1 in May,

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