Two Types of Definites in Natural Language



Download 1.05 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet5/27
Sana30.10.2020
Hajmi1.05 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   27

PART.
at
the
weak
pokluad
pencil
auer?
over
‘Can you throw the pencil to me?’
(Ebert 1971a, p. 104)
About the context of this sentence, Ebert writes:
A liegt auf dem Teppich und liest. Ohne aufzublicken bittet er B, der
am Schreibtisch sitzt [37]. [. . . ] Diese ¨
Außerung ist nur dann ad¨
aquat,
wenn A weiß, daß nur ein einziger Bleistift in B’s greifbarer N¨
ahe liegt.
Der D-Artikel ist in dieser Situation unm¨
oglich. Blickt A jedoch von seiner
Lekt¨
ure auf und schaut den gew¨
unschten Gegenstand an, kann sowohl A-
als auch D-Artikel stehen, auch wenn der gemeinte Gegenstand durch die
Situation eindeutig spezifiziert [. . . ] ist. Ausschlaggebend ist, daß durch
die hinweisende Geste der Referent identifiziert werden k¨
onnte.
36


A is lying on the carpet and reading. Without looking up, he asks B, who is sitting
at the desk, [(37)] [. . . ] This utterance is only adequate if A knows that there is only
a single pencil in reachable distance for B. The [strong; FS] D- article is impossible in
this situation. If A looks up from his reading and looks at the desired object, both the
[weak; FS] A- and the [strong; FS] D-article can be used, even if the intended object
is uniquely specified in the situation [. . . ] What matters is that the referent could be
identified by means of the pointing gesture.
(Ebert 1971a, p. 104)
Ebert’s discussion of this example indicates that the difference between the two
articles lies in how their conditions of use relate to the context. While the strong
article seems to require that a referent for the definite description has been introduced
linguistically in the preceding discourse or is provided by a deictic gesture, the weak
article seems to require that there is one and only one individual (in the given context)
that matches the descriptive content of the noun phrase. This brings us to the next
type of use, the situational uniqueness use, which requires the weak article.
2.2.3
Uniqueness Uses of the Weak Article
2.2.3.1
The Weak Article and Situational Uniqueness
Ebert’s (1971a) discussion of (38) provides a nice introduction to the central use
of the weak article.
(38)
a. A
the
weak

unj
dog
hee
has
tuswark.
tooth ache
‘The dog has a tooth ache.’
b. Di
the
strong

unj
dog
hee
has
tuswark.
tooth ache
‘The dog has a tooth ache.’
(Ebert 1971a, p. 83)
Beide ¨
Außerungen setzen voraus, daß der H¨
orer bereits weiß, welcher
Hund gemeint ist. Die Voraussetzungen sind aber f¨
ur [(38a)] und [(38b)]
verschiedener Art. [(38b)] ist eine ad¨
aquate ¨
Außerung, wenn der Hund im
vorhergehenden Text spezifiziert wurde; der D-Artikel weist dann anapho-
risch auf den Textreferenten. [(38a)] setzt voraus, daß der gemeinte Hund
37


nicht n¨
aher spezifiziert zu werden braucht, weil zur Zeit und am Ort des
Sprechaktes nur ein einziger Hund als Referent in Frage kommt.
Both utterances presuppose that the hearer already knows which dog is meant.
But the presuppositions for [the two forms] are of a different nature. [(38b)] is an
adequate utterance if the dog was specified in the preceding text; the [strong; FS]
D-article then refers anaphorically to the text referent. [(38a)] presupposes that the
intended dog does not need to be specified any further, because there is only one dog
at the time and place of the speech act that could be meant.
(Ebert 1971a, p. 83)
What apparently is crucial to make the weak article available, both in this case
and in (37) above, is that there is a unique referent fitting the description of the noun
phrase. A deictic gesture or a textual antecedent, on the other hand can make the
strong (D-) article possible, whether or not there is a unique referent meeting the
descriptive content of the noun phrase in the context.
In terms of Hawkins’ classification, Ebert’s Fering examples in (38a) (as well as
in 37) are clear cases of immediate situation uses. With respect to the nature of
the uniqueness condition, Krifka (1984) further characterizes the non-anaphoric uses
of the weak article in more detail by tying them to the shared world knowledge of
speakers and hearers, as his discussion of the following example shows.
(39)
(Was ist los? [What is going on?])
a. Der
the
Postbote
mailman
kommt.
comes
‘The mailman is coming.’
b. ?Der
the
Mann
man
kommt.
comes
‘The man is coming.’
(Krifka 1984, p. 28)
Der Postbote ist ein typischer W-definiter Ausdruck: er referiert auf
einen bestimmmten Funktionstr¨
ager, den man in h¨
auslichen Kontexten
so wenig eigens in den Text einf¨
uhren muß wie Unikate, z.B. den Mond.
Der Mann kann sich hingegen in den meisten Kontexten nur auf einen im
laufenden Text einqef¨
uhrten Referenten beziehen; Mann zu sein identi-
fiziert meist keine Entit¨
at aus dem gemeinsamen Weltwissen von Sprecher
und H¨
orer.
38


The mailman is a typical W-definite expression: it refers to a particular functional role
that is no more required to be introduced in domestic contexts than unique entities
such as the moon. The man, however, can only refer to a referent introduced in the
ongoing discourse in most contexts. Being a man usually does not identify one entity
in the common world knowledge of speaker and hearer.
(Krifka 1984, p. 28)
This view based on shared world knowledge is, of course, very much in line with the
general perspective on presuppositions in the tradition of Stalnaker (Stalnaker 1973,
Stalnaker 1974, Stalnaker 1978, Stalnaker 2002), which sees the common ground of
mutually shared speaker and hearer knowledge as the place where presuppositions
have to be satisfied. I will return to this aspect of the interpretation of the weak
article in chapter 4 in more detail.
Turning to German examples in light of Hawkins’ classification, it is clear that
both immediate and larger situation uses generally require the weak article, as can
be seen from the examples below.
17
(40)
Immediate Situation Use
Das
the
Buch,
book
das
that
du
you
suchst,
look for
steht
stands
im
in-the
weak
/
/
#in
in
dem
the
strong
Glasschrank.
glass-cabinet
‘The book that you are looking for is in the glass-cabinet.’
17
The marked status of the strong article forms in immediate situation uses is sometimes graded.
This can be due, for one thing, to the contracted form not being fully acceptable from a prescriptive
standpoint (as in (40), for example), but also to the possibility of a truly demonstrative use (with
some type of pointing gesture) of the strong article. The judgments here reflect my own intuitions
about what would be the most natural form to use. (The subtlety of the differences in the conditions
of use for these cases is capture well by Ebert’s discussion of (36) and (37) above.) If these sentences
occur in a context where there is an antecedent for the strong-article definite, it of course becomes
perfectly acceptable.
39


(41)
Larger Situation Use
Der
the
Einbrecher
burglar
ist
is
zum Gl¨
uck
luckily
vom
by-the
weak
/
/
#von
by
dem
the
strong
Hund
dog
verjagt
chase away
worden.
been
‘Luckily, the burglar was chased away by the dog.’
(42)
Larger Situation Use
Der
The
Empfang
reception
wurde
was
vom
by-the
weak
/
/
#von
by
dem
the
strong

urgermeister
mayor
er¨
offnet.
opened
‘The reception was opened by the mayor.’
(43)
Global Situation Use
Armstrong
Armstrong
flog
flew
als
as
erster
first one
zum
to-the
weak
Mond.
moon
‘Armstrong was the first one to fly to the moon.’
Ebert provides similar examples of larger situation uses for Fering:
(44)
A
the
weak
sarkkooken
church bells
ringd
rang
jister
yesterday
inj.
night
‘The church bells rang yesterday night.’
(45)
A
the
weak

oning
king
kaam
came
to
to
bisch¨
uk.
visit
‘The king came for a visit.’
Fering (Ebert 1971a, p. 82-83)
In all of these cases, the weak-article definites are understood as referring to
the unique individual that has the relevant property in the suitably sized context.
One could characterize this by saying that they uniquely denote within a specific
situation.
18
The size of the situation that is considered can vary, e.g. from a family
18
A precise analysis of what situations weak-article definites can be interpreted in is presented in
chapter 4.
40


context (38a, 40, 41) to a town (42, 44), a whole country (45), or the world as a whole
(43). In Ebert’s words, all these examples have in common ‘[. . . ] that they can refer
without further specification’, and show that the ‘A-article can also refer to objects
that are not globally unique in certain cases, i.e., to ‘situationally unique objects”
(Ebert 1971a, p. 71).
Yet another piece of evidence for the crucial role of uniqueness for the weak article
comes from the following minimal pair, which suggests that it constitutes a necessary
condition for its use.
(46)
a.
In
In
der
the
Kabinettsitzung
cabinet meeting
heute
today
wird
is
ein
a
neuer
new
Vorschlag
proposal
vom
by-the
A
Kanzler
chancellor
erwartet.
expected
‘In today’s cabinet meeting, a new proposal by the chancellor is ex-
pected.’
b. # In
In
der
the
Kabinettsitzung
cabinet meeting
heute
today
wird
is
ein
a
neuer
new
Vorschlag
proposal
vom
by-the
A
Minister
minister
erwartet.
expected
‘In today’s cabinet meeting, a new proposal by the minister is expected.’
It is generally known that the cabinet consists of the chancellor and all the minis-
ters. Given any normal cabinet meeting situation, there will be several ministers but
only one chancellor. As can be seen in (46a), it is perfectly fine to refer to the chan-
cellor in that situation with a weak-article definite. However, if we replace chancellor
with minister, as in (46b), the sentence becomes odd. If it makes sense at all, the
hearer accommodates that only one minister is present at this rather strange cabinet
meeting. Another possible context in which (46b) is felicitous would be if the speaker
and the addressee have a special relationship to one of the ministers, e.g., because
they’re working for one. In such a case, the weak article would refer to that minister
41


to which they have a unique relationship. In either case, this goes to show, then, that
the weak article can only be felicitously used when there is a unique individual that
the hearer can single out by means of the description, either because it is the unique
individual meeting the description in the situation talked about or in a situation that
is salient to both the speaker and the hearer (this informal characterization will be
formally implemented in a situation semantic framework in chapter 4).
A similar point about the weak article requiring uniqueness can be made in con-
nection with (26) from above, where the first sentence makes it clear that a place
with more than one room is under discussion.
(26)
Bei
During
der
the
Gutshausbesichtigung
mansion tour
hat
has
mich
me
eines
one
der
the
GEN
Zimmer
rooms
besonders
especially
beeindruckt.
impressed
Angeblich
Supposedly
hat
has
Goethe
Goethe
im
in-the
weak
Jahr
year
1810
1810
eine
a
Nacht
night
#im
in-the
weak
/
/
in
in
dem
the
strong
Zimmer
room
verbracht.
spent
‘One of the rooms especially impressed me during the mansion tour. Suppos-
edly Goethe spent a night in the room in 1810.’
Additional support for the idea that uniqueness is crucial for the weak article
comes from the fact that whenever the semantic content of the noun phrase description
ensures uniqueness, the weak article is used. Cases in point include noun phrases
containing a superlative adjective, and nouns like original :
(47)
a. Auf
on
unserer
our
Reise
trip
nach
to
Tibet
Tibet
sind
are
wir
we
nat¨
urlich
of course
auch
also
zum
to-the
weak
/
/
#zu
to
dem
the
strong

ochsten
highest
Berg
mountain
der
the
GEN
Welt
world
gefahren.
driven
‘On our trip to Tibet, we of course went to visit the highest mountain of
the world.’
42


b. Man
one
kann
can
die
the
Kopie
copy
des
the
Gen
Gem¨
aldes
painting
kaum
barely
vom
of-the
Original
original
unterscheiden.
distinguish
‘One can barely distinguish the copy of the painting from the original.’
The meaning of the superlative zum h¨
ochsten Berg der Welt in (47a) implies that
only one mountain can be the highest. Nouns like original in (47b) imply that there
is one distinguished entity that is the original of an artwork, for example.
In (47a), the domain within which uniqueness holds is explicitly given as the entire
world, but in most cases, including many of the examples discussed above, it is clear
that uniqueness does not necessarily hold globally - this is the issue of incomplete
descriptions mentioned earlier. In such cases, uniqueness will be evaluated relative
to an implicitly restricted domain. Chapter 3 discusses domain restriction in detail
and argues for a situation semantic analysis thereof. Chapter 4 spells out the role of
situational domain restriction in the analysis of weak-article definites.
2.2.3.2
Covarying Uses of the Weak Article
As was the case with the strong article, it is clear that in addition to the referential
uses considered so far, there also are cases where definite descriptions with the weak
article receive a covarying interpretation in a quantificational context.
(48)
Jedes
Every
Mal,
time
wenn
when
eine
a
Runde
round
vorbei
over
ist,
is
werden
are
die
the
Karten
cards
vom
by-the
weak
Gewinner
winner
neu
newly
gemischt
shuffled
und
and
verteilt.
dealt
‘Every time when a round is over, the cards are shuffled and dealt anew by
the winner.’
In (48), the definite description the
weak
winner does not refer to only one indi-
vidual, but rather is intended to pick out, for each round, the winner of that round.
43


Many more examples of this kind will be discussed below when looking at cases of
bridging that I eventually subsume under the general situational uniqueness analysis.
For the moment, the point is simply to make clear that such covarying interpretations
do exist for the weak article.
2.2.3.3
Apparent Anaphoric Uses of the Weak Article
For the most part, the literature suggests, explicitly or implicitly, that the weak
article cannot be used anaphorically. The extent to which one accepts this as correct,
however, depends on what exactly counts as an anaphoric use. There certainly are
examples in which the weak article is felicitous in referring to an entity that was
previously introduced linguistically:
(49)
Meyer
Meyer
hat
has
sich
REFL
ein
a
Haus
house
mit
with
Garten
yard
gekauft.
bought.
Im
In-the
Haus
house
selber
itself

alt
stays
sich
REFL
Meyer
Meyer
tags¨
uber
during the day
nur
only
selten
rarely
auf.
Download 1.05 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   27




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©hozir.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling

    Bosh sahifa
davlat universiteti
ta’lim vazirligi
O’zbekiston respublikasi
maxsus ta’lim
zbekiston respublikasi
axborot texnologiyalari
o’rta maxsus
davlat pedagogika
nomidagi toshkent
pedagogika instituti
guruh talabasi
texnologiyalari universiteti
toshkent axborot
xorazmiy nomidagi
navoiy nomidagi
samarqand davlat
haqida tushuncha
ta’limi vazirligi
toshkent davlat
nomidagi samarqand
rivojlantirish vazirligi
Darsning maqsadi
vazirligi toshkent
tashkil etish
Toshkent davlat
Alisher navoiy
Ўзбекистон республикаси
matematika fakulteti
kommunikatsiyalarini rivojlantirish
bilan ishlash
pedagogika universiteti
sinflar uchun
Nizomiy nomidagi
o’rta ta’lim
таълим вазирлиги
fanining predmeti
maxsus ta'lim
fanlar fakulteti
tibbiyot akademiyasi
ta'lim vazirligi
махсус таълим
umumiy o’rta
Referat mavzu
ishlab chiqarish
haqida umumiy
fizika matematika
Toshkent axborot
vazirligi muhammad
universiteti fizika
Fuqarolik jamiyati
Navoiy davlat