Blackland Prairie Ecoregion Associated Maps



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Group

 

Family

Species Name

Federal Status

Invertebrates













Symphyla (Myriapoda)













Scolopendrellidae

Symphyllela texana

SC







Scolopendrellidae

Symphyllela pusilla

SC




Polydesmida (Myriapoda)













Polydesmidae

Speodesmus castellanus

SC







Polydesmidae

Speodesmus falcatus

SC







Polydesmidae

Speodesmus ivyi

SC







Polydesmidae

Speodesmus reddelli

SC




Araneae (Arachnida)













Dictynidae

Cicurina baronia

FE







Dictynidae

Cicurina gatita

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina madla

FE







Dictynidae

Cicurina medina

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina minorata (Gersch and Davis)

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina venii

FE







Dictynidae

Cicurina vespera

FE







Leptonetidae

Neoleptoneta new species

SC







Nesticidae

Eidmannella nasuta (Gertsch)

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina armadillo

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina bandida

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina cueva

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina elliotti

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina reddelli

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina reyesi

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina travisae

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina wartoni

SC







Leptonetidae

Neoleptoneta concinna (Gertsch)

SC







Leptonetidae

Neoleptoneta devia (Gertsch)

SC







Linyphiidae

Meioneta llanoensis (Gertsch and Davis)

SC







Nesticidae

Eidmannella reclusa (Gertsch)

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina aenigma

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina ezelli

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina russeli

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina ubicki

SC







Leptonetidae

Neoleptoneta new species

SC







Dictynadae

Cicurina (Cicurella) caliga

SC







Dictynadae

Cicurina (Cicurella) hoodensis

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina bowni

SC







Dictynidae

Cicurina vibora

SC







Leptonetidae

Neoleptoneta anopica (Gertsch)

SC







Leptonetidae

Neoleptoneta paraconcinna

SC




Opiliones (Arachnida)













Phalangodidae

Texella mulaiki (Goodnight and Goodnight)

SC




Pseudoscorpiones (Arachnida)













Neobisiidae

Tartarocreagris infernalis (Muchmore)

SC







Neobisiidae

Tartarocreagris texana (Muchmore)

FE







Neobisiidae

Tartarocreagris comanche (Muchmore)

SC







Neobisiidae

Tartarocreagris cookei

SC







Neobisiidae

Tartarocreagris hoodensis

SC







Neobisiidae

Tartarocreagris reyesi

SC




Coleoptera (Insecta)













Carabidae

Rhadine exilis

FE







Carabidae

Rhadine infernalis

FE







**Carabidae

Rhadine persephone

FE







Carabidae

Rhadine reyesi

SC







**Silphidae

Nicrophorus americanus

FE







Staphylinidae (Pselaphidae)

Batrisodes (Babnormodes) gravesi (Chandler and Reddell)

SC







Staphylinidae (Pselaphidae)

Batrisodes (Babnormodes) uncicornis (Casey)

SC







Staphylinidae (Pselaphidae)

Batrisodes (Excavodes) cryptotexanus (Chandler and Reddell)

SC







Staphylinidae (Pselaphidae)

Texamaurops reddelli (Barr and Steeves)

SC




Lepidoptera (Insecta)













Hesperiidae

Megathymus streckeri texanus

SC




Hymenoptera (Insecta)













Apoidea

Andrena (Tylandrena) scotoptera (Cockerell)

SC







Apoidea

Colletes bumeliae (Neff)

SC







Apoidea

Colletes inuncantipedis (Neff)

SC







Apoidea

Eucera (Synhalonia) birkmanniella (Cockerell)

SC







Apoidea

Eucera (Synhalonia) texana (Timberlake)

SC







Apoidea

Hesperapis (Carinapis) sp. B

SC







Apoidea

Megachile (Megachiloides) parksi (Mitchell)

SC







Apoidea

Osmia (Diceratosmia) botitena (Cockerell)

SC







Apoidea

Stelis (Protostelis) texana (Thorp)

SC

Location and Condition of the Blackland Prairie Ecoregion


Taking their name from the fertile, dark clay soil, the Blackland Prairies constitute a true prairie ecosystem and have some of the richest, naturally fertile soils in the world. Characterized by gently rolling to nearly level topography, the land is well dissected and marked by rapid surface drainage. Pecan, cedar elm, various oaks, soapberry, honey locust, hackberry and Osage orange dot the landscape, with some mesquite invading from the south. A true tall-grass prairie, the dominant grass is little bluestem. Other important grasses include big bluestem, Indiangrass, eastern gammagrass, switchgrass and sideoats grama. While elevations from 300 to more than 800 feet AMSL match those of the Post Oak Savannah, the annual rainfall varies from 30 to 40 inches west to east, and the average annual temperatures range from approximately 66°F to 70°F. Described as "black velvet" when freshly plowed and moistened from a good rain, true blackland soils are deep, dark, calcareous deposits renowned for their high productivity (Wasowski, 1988). Scientists believe the richness of the prairie soils is derived from the abundant invertebrate fauna and fungal flora found in the soils themselves. The Blackland Prairies are today almost entirely brought under the plow, with only 5,000 acres of the original 12 million remaining. For this reason, many authorities believe that the Blackland Prairies represent some of the rarest landscapes in Texas.
Like many of the prairie communities comprising the Great Plains of North America, the Blackland Prairies harbor few rare plants or animals. What is special and unique about this ecosystem today, are the grassland communities themselves.
This ecoregion can be broken down into seven main habitat classes consisting of grassland, forest, native and introduced grasses, parkland, parkland woodland mosaic, woodland, forest, and grassland mosaic, and urban.

Blackland Prairie Forest


The Blackland Prairie forest consists of deciduous or evergreen trees that are dominant in the landscape. These species are mostly greater than 30 feet tall with closed crowns or nearly so (71-100% canopy cover). The midstory is generally apparent except in managed monocultures (McMahan et al. 1984, Bridges et al. 2002). One plant association dominates this habitat class.
The water oak-elm-hackberry association includes cedar elm, American elm, willow oak, southern red oak, white oak, black willow, cottonwood, red ash, sycamore, pecan, bois d'arc (osage-orange), flowering dogwood, dewberry, coral-berry, dallisgrass, switchgrass, rescuegrass, bermudagrass, eastern gamagrass, Virginia wildrye, Johnsongrass, giant ragweed, and Leavenworth eryngo. This association typically occurs in the upper flood plains of the Sabine, Neches, Sulphur and Trinity Rivers and tributaries (McMahan et al. 1984). Cross-referenced communities: 1) water oak-post oak floodplain forests (Bezanson 2000). This community is considered of low priority for further protection since this community is generally unthreatened even though not many examples of this association are protected (Bezanson 2000).
Blackland Prairie Grassland
Grasslands consist of herbs (grasses, forbs, and grasslike plants) which are dominant. Woody vegetation is lacking or nearly so (generally 10% or less woody canopy cover) (McMahan et al.1984). There is one plant association still found in scattered patches within the Blackland Prairie grassland.
The silver bluestem-Texas wintergrass association includes little bluestem, sideoats grama, Texas grama, three-awn, hairy grama, tall dropseed, buffalograss, windmillgrass, hairy tridens, tumblegrass, western ragweed, broom snakeweed, Texas bluebonnet, live oak, post oak, and mesquite. This association is found primarily in the Cross Timbers and Prairies ecoregion; however tiny scattered areas still exist in the Blackland Prairie ecoregion (McMahan et al. 1984). Cross-referenced communities: 1) little bluestem-Indiangrass series (Diamond 1993), 2) upland millisol tall grassland (Bezanson 2000), and 3) little bluestem-sideoats grama herbaceous alliance (Weakley et al. 2000). This community is considered imperiled, or very rare, globally. It is endangered throughout its range. It is determined that 6 to 20 occurrences are documented (Diamond 1993). This association is also considered imperiled, or very rare, throughout the state. Approximately 6 to 20 occurrences have been documented, therefore, this association is considered vulnerable to extirpation within the state (Diamond 1993). According to Bezanson (2000) this should be a community of high priority for further protection.
Blackland Prairie Native and Introduced Grasses
A mixture of native and introduced grasses which includes herbs (grasses, forbs, and grasslike plants) that are dominant with woody vegetation lacking or nearly so (generally 10% or less woody canopy cover). These associations typically result from the clearing of woody vegetation and can be easily associated with the early stages of a young forest. This community is located in northeast and east central Texas (Blackland Prairie), the South Texas Plains, and the Gulf Coast Prairies and Marshes ecoregion. This community can quickly change as removed brush begins to regrow (McMahan et al. 1984, Bridges et al. 2002).


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