Nizomiy nomidagi toshkent davlat pedagogika universiteti fizika-matematika fakulteti



Download 0.75 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet51/51
Sana13.05.2020
Hajmi0.75 Mb.
1   ...   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

69 


IZOHLI LUG’AT 

1.   


GALAKTIKA- GALAXY 

A  galaxy  is  a  massive,  gravitationally  bound  system  that  consists 

of stars and stellar remnants, an interstellar medium of gas dust, and an 

important  but  poorly  understood  component  tentatively  dubbed  dark 

matter.The  name  is  from  the  Greek  word  galaxias,  literally  meaning 

"milky",  a  reference  to  the  Milky  Way  galaxy.  Typical  galaxies  range 

from  dwarfs  with  as few  as  ten  million  (107) stars, up to giants  with  a 

hundred trillion (1014) stars,[4] all orbiting the galaxy's center of mass. 

Galaxies  may  contain  many  star  systems,  star  clusters,  and  various 

interstellar clouds. The Sun is one of the stars in the Milky Way galaxy; 

the  Solar  System  includes  the  Earth  and  all  the  other  objects  that orbit 

the Sun. 

2.   

SPIRAL GALAKTIKA- SPIRAL GALAXY 



An  example of a spiral galaxy, the Pinwheel  Galaxy  (also  known 

as Messier 101 or NGC 5457) 

A spiral galaxy is a certain kind of galaxy originally described by 

Edwin Hubble in his 1936 work The Realm of the Nebulae and, as such, 

forms  part  of  the  Hubble  sequence.  Spiral  galaxies  consist  of  a  flat, 

rotating disk containing stars, gas and dust, and a central concentration 

of  stars  known  as  the  bulge.  These  are  surrounded  by  a  much  fainter 

halo of stars, many of which reside in globular clusters. 

Spiral galaxies are named for the spiral structures that extend from 

the  center  into  the  disk.  The  spiral  arms  are  sites  of  ongoing  star 

formation  and  are  brighter  than  the  surrounding  disk  because  of  the 

young, hot OB stars that inhabit them. 

3.   

GALO- HALO 



The galactic disk is surrounded by a spheroid halo of old stars and 

globular  clusters,  of  which  90%  lie  within  100,000  light-years  (30 

kpc),[50]  suggesting  a  stellar  halo  diameter  of  200,000  light-years. 

However, a few globular clusters have been found farther, such as PAL 

4  and  AM1  at  more  than  200,000  light-years  away  from  the  galactic 

center.  About  40%  of  these  clusters  are  on  retrograde  orbits,  which 

means they move in the opposite direction from the Milky Way rotation. 

The  globular  clusters  can  follow  rosette  orbits  about  the  galaxy,  in 

contrast to the elliptical orbit of a planet. 

While  the  disk  contains  gas  and  dust  which  obscure  the  view  in 

some  wavelengths,  the  spheroid  component  does  not.  Active  star 

formation  takes  place  in  the  disk  (especially  in  the  spiral  arms,  which 

represent areas of high density), but not in the halo. Open clusters also 

occur primarily in the disk. 

Discoveries in the early 21st century have added dimension to the 

knowledge  of  the  Milky  Way's  structure.  With  the  discovery  that  the 

disk  of  the  Andromeda  Galaxy  (M31)  extends  much  further  than 



 

70 


previously thought, the possibility of the disk of the Milky Way galaxy 

extending further is apparent, and this is supported by evidence from the 

discovery  of  the  Outer  Arm  extension  of  the  Cygnus  Arm.  With  the 

discovery of the Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy came the discovery 

of  a  ribbon  of  galactic  debris  as  the  polar  orbit  of  the  dwarf  and  its 

interaction  with  the  Milky  Way  tears  it  apart.  Similarly,  with  the 

discovery of the Canis Major Dwarf Galaxy, it was found that a ring of 

galactic  debris  from  its  interaction  with  the  Milky  Way  encircles  the 

galactic disk. 

4.   


GALAKTIKA MARKAZI- GALACTIC CENTER 

Main article: Galactic Center 

 Observed structure of the Milky Way's spiral arms. The Sun is in 

the Local Spur. 

The galactic disc, which bulges outward at the galactic center, has 

a  diameter  of  70,000–100,000  light-years  (20–30  kpc).  The  exact 

distance  from  the  Sun  to  the  galactic  center  is  actively  debated.  The 

latest  estimates  from  geometric-based  methods  and  standard  candles 

yield distances to the Galactic center of 7.6–8.7 kpc (25,000–28,000 ly). 

The  fact  that  the  estimates  span  over  1  kpc  only  underscores  the  true 

uncertainty associated with the distance to the Galactic center. 

The galactic center harbors a compact object of very large mass as 

determined  by  the  motion  of  material  around  the  center.  The  intense 

radio  source  named  Sagittarius  A*,  thought  to  mark  the  center  of  the 

Milky Way, is newly confirmed to be a supermassive black hole. Most 

galaxies are believed to have supermassive black holes at their centers. 

5.   

SPIRAL TARMOQLAR- SPIRAL ARMS 



 Observed and extrapolated structure of the spiral arms. 

 Artist's  conception  of  the  spiral  structure  of  the  Milky  Way  with 

two major stellar arms and a bar. 

Maps of the Milky Way's spiral structure are notoriously uncertain 

and exhibit striking differences. Some 150 years after Alexander (1852) 

first  suggested  that  the  Milky  Way  was  a  spiral,  there  is  currently  no 

consensus on the number or nature of the Galaxy's spiral arms. Perfect 

grand  design  logarithmic  spiral  patterns  ineptly  describe  features  near 

the  Sun,  namely  since  galaxies  commonly  exhibit  arms  that  branch, 

merge,  twist  unexpectedly,  and  feature  a  degree  of  irregularity.  The 

possible scenario of the Sun within a spur / Local arm emphasizes that 

point  and  indicates  that  such  features  are  likely  not  unique,  and  exist 

elsewhere in the galaxy. 

6.   


GALAKTIKALARNI 

SINFLASHTIRISH- 

THE 

HUBBLE 


SEQUENCE IS A MORPHOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION SCHEME FOR 

The Hubble sequence is a morphological classification scheme for 

galaxies  invented  by  Edwin  Hubble  in  1926.  It  is  often  known 

colloquially as the Hubble tuning-fork diagram because of the shape in 




 

71 


which it is traditionally represented. 

 Tuning-fork style diagram of the Hubble sequence 

Hubble’s  scheme  divides  regular  galaxies  into  3  broad  classes  - 

ellipticals,  lenticulars  and  spirals  -  based  on  their  visual  appearance 

(originally  on  photographic  plates).  A  fourth  class  contains  galaxies 

with  an  irregular  appearance.  To  this  day,  the  Hubble  sequence  is  the 

most  commonly  used  system  for  classifying  galaxies,  both  in 

professional astronomical research and in amateur astronomy. 

 

 

7.   



ELLIPTIK GALAKTIKA- ELLIPTICAL GALAXY 

An  elliptical  galaxy  is  a  galaxy  having  an  approximately 

ellipsoidal  shape  and  a  smooth,  nearly  featureless  brightness  profile. 

They range in shape from nearly spherical to highly flat and in size from 

hundreds of millions to over one trillion stars. They can be the result of 

two galaxies colliding. 

Elliptical  galaxies  are  one  of  the  three  main  classes  of  galaxy 

originally described by American astronomer Edwin Hubble in his 1936 

work  The  Realm  of  the  Nebulae,  along  with  spiral  and  lenticular 

galaxies.  Elliptical  galaxies  are  (together  with  lenticular  galaxies)  also 

called  "early-type"  galaxies  (ETG),  due  to  their  location  in  the  Hubble 

sequence. 

8.   

NOTO’G’RI GALAKTIKA- IRREGULARS 



Galaxies  that  do  not  fit  into  the  Hubble  sequence,  because  they 

have  no  regular  structure  (either  disk-like  or  ellipsoidal),  are  termed 

irregular galaxies. Hubble defined two classes of irregular galaxy: 

Irr I galaxies have asymmetric profiles and lack a central bulge or 

obvious spiral structure; instead they contain many individual clusters of 

young stars 

Irr II galaxies have smoother, asymmetric appearances and are not 

clearly resolved into individual stars or stellar clusters 




 

72 


In his extension to the Hubble sequence, de Vaucouleurs called the 

Irr I galaxies 'Magellanic irregulars', after the Magellanic Clouds  - two 

satellites  of  the  Milky  Way  which  Hubble  classified  as  Irr  I.  The 

discovery  of  a  faint spiral structure[10]  in  the  Large  Magellanic  Cloud 

led  de  Vaucouleurs  to  further  divide  the  irregular  galaxies  into  those 

that,  like  the  LMC,  show  some  evidence  for  spiral  structure  (these  are 

given the symbol Sm) and those that have no obvious structure, such as 

the  Small  Magellanic  Cloud  (denoted  Im).  In  the  extended  Hubble 

sequence, the Magellanic irregulars are usually placed at the end of the 

spiral branch of the Hubble tuning fork. 

9.   

GALAKTIKA DISKI- DISC (GALAXY) 



A disc is a component of disc galaxies, such as spiral galaxies, or 

lenticular galaxies. 

The galactic disc is the plane in which the spirals, bars and discs of 

disc  galaxies  exist.  Galaxy  discs  tend  to  have  more  gas  and  dust,  and 

younger stars than galactic bulges, or galactic haloes. 

The  galactic  disc  is  mainly  composed  of  gas,  dust  and  stars.  The 

gas and dust component of the galactic disk is called the gaseous disk. 

The star component of the galactic disk is called the stellar disk 

10.  

ASTRONOMIYA-ASTRONOMY 



Astronomy is a natural science that deals with the study of celestial 

objects  (such  as  stars,  planets,  comets,  nebulae,  star  clusters  and 

galaxies)  and  phenomena  that  originate  outside  the  Earth's  atmosphere 

(such  as  the  cosmic  background  radiation).  It  is  concerned  with  the 

evolution,  physics,  chemistry,  meteorology,  and  motion  of  celestial 

objects, as well as the formation and development of the universe. 

11.  

YULDUZ-STAR 



A  star  is  a  massive,  luminous  ball  of  plasma  held  together  by 

gravity. At the end of its lifetime, a star can also contain a proportion of 

degenerate  matter.  The  nearest  star  to  Earth  is  the  Sun,  which  is  the 

source of most of the energy on Earth. Other stars are visible from Earth 

during  the  night  when  they  are not outshone by  the  Sun or blocked by 

atmospheric  phenomena.  Historically,  the  most  prominent  stars  on  the 

celestial sphere were grouped together into constellations and asterisms, 

and  the  brightest  stars  gained  proper  names.  Extensive  catalogues  of 

stars have been assembled by astronomers, which provide standardized 

star designations. 

12.  

QO‘SHALOQ YULDUZ - DOUBLE STAR 



A  binary  star  is  a  star  system  consisting  of  two  stars  orbiting 

around  their  common  center  of  mass.  The  brighter  star  is  called  the 

primary  and  the  other  is  its  companion  star,  comes,  or  secondary. 

Research between the early 19th century  and today suggests that many 

stars  are  part  of  either  binary  star  systems  or  star  systems  with  more 

than  two  stars,  called  multiple  star  systems.  The  term  double  star  may 




 

73 


be  used  synonymously  with  binary  star,  but  more  generally,  a  double 

star may be either a binary star or an optical double star which consists 

of  two  stars  with  no  physical  connection  but  which  appear  close 

together  in  the  sky  as  seen  from  the  Earth.  A  double  star  may  be 

determined  to  be  optical  if  its  components  have  sufficiently  different 

proper  motions  or  radial  velocities,  or  if  parallax  measurements  reveal 

its  two  components  to  be  at  sufficiently  different  distances  from  the 

Earth.  Most  known  double  stars  have  not  yet  been  determined  to  be 

either bound binary star systems or optical doubles.  

13.  


MASSIV YULDUZ - MASSIVE STARS 

During their helium-burning phase, very high mass stars with more 

than nine solar masses expand to form red supergiants. Once this fuel is 

exhausted  at  the  core,  they  can  continue  to  fuse  elements  heavier  than 

helium. 

The core contracts until the temperature and pressure are sufficient 

to  fuse  carbon  (see  carbon  burning  process).  This  process  continues, 

with  the  successive  stages  being  fueled  by  neon  (see  neon  burning 

process), oxygen (see oxygen burning process), and silicon (see silicon 

burning process). Near the end of the star's life, fusion can occur along a 

series of  onion-layer  shells  within  the  star. Each  shell  fuses  a  different 

element, with the outermost shell fusing hydrogen; the next shell fusing 

helium, and so forth. 

The  final  stage  is  reached  when  the  star  begins  producing  iron. 

Since iron nuclei are more tightly bound than any heavier nuclei, if they 

are  fused  they  do  not  release  energy—the  process  would,  on  the 

contrary, consume energy. Likewise, since they are more tightly bound 

than all lighter nuclei, energy cannot be released by fission. In relatively 

old, very massive stars, a large core of inert iron will accumulate in the 

center  of  the  star.  The  heavier  elements  in  these  stars  can  work  their 

way  up  to  the  surface,  forming  evolved  objects  known  as  Wolf-Rayet 

stars that have a dense stellar wind which sheds the outer atmosphere. 

14.  

CHANG – COLLAPSE 



An  evolved,  average-size  star  will  now  shed  its  outer  layers  as  a 

planetary  nebula.  If  what  remains  after  the  outer  atmosphere  has  been 

shed  is  less  than  1.4  solar  masses,  it  shrinks  to  a  relatively  tiny  object 

(about  the  size  of  Earth)  that  is  not  massive  enough  for  further 

compression  to  take  place,  known  as  a  white  dwarf.      The  electron-

degenerate  matter  inside  a  white  dwarf  is  no  longer  a  plasma,  even 

though stars are generally referred to as being spheres of plasma. White 

dwarfs will eventually fade into black dwarfs over a very long stretch of 

time. 

 The Crab Nebula, remnants of a supernova that was first observed 



around 1050 AD 

In  larger  stars,  fusion  continues  until  the  iron  core  has  grown  so 




 

74 


large (more than 1.4 solar masses) that it can no longer support its own 

mass. This core will suddenly collapse as its electrons are driven into its 

protons, forming neutrons and neutrinos in a burst of inverse beta decay

or  electron  capture.  The  shockwave  formed  by  this  sudden  collapse 

causes the rest of the star to explode in a supernova. Supernovae are so 

bright  that  they  may  briefly  outshine  the  star's  entire  home  galaxy. 

When  they  occur  within  the  Milky  Way,  supernovae  have  historically 

been  observed  by  naked-eye  observers  as  "new  stars"  where  none 

existed before. 

15.  


SPEKTR-SPECTR 

 Astronomical spectroscopy is the technique of spectroscopy used 

in  astronomy.  The  object  of  study  is  the  spectrum  of  electromagnetic 

radiation,  including  visible  light,  which  radiates  from  stars  and  other 

celestial objects. Spectroscopy can be used to derive many properties of 

distant  stars  and galaxies, such  as  their  chemical  composition, but  also 

their motion by Doppler shift measurements. 

16.  


SPEKTRASKOP – SPECTROSCOPY 

Spectroscopy  is  the  study  of  the  interaction  between  matter  and 

radiated energy. Historically, spectroscopy originated through the study 

of  visible light dispersed  according to its wavelength, e.g., by  a  prism. 

Later the concept was expanded greatly to comprise any interaction with 

radiative  energy  as  a  function  of  its  wavelength  or  frequency. 

Spectroscopic  data  is  often  represented  by  a  spectrum,  a  plot  of  the 

response of interest as a function of wavelength or frequency. 

Spectrometry  and  spectrography  are  terms  used  to  refer  to  the 

measurement of radiation intensity as a function of wavelength and are 

often  used  to  describe  experimental  spectroscopic  methods.  Spectral 

measurement 

devices 

are 


referred 

to 


as 

spectrometers, 

spectrophotometers, spectrographs or spectral analyzers. 

17.  


OSMON-THE SKY 

he sky is the part of the atmosphere or outer space visible from the 

surface of any astronomical object. It is difficult to define precisely for 

several reasons. During daylight, the sky of Earth has the appearance of 

a  pale  blue  surface  because  the  air  scatters  the  sunlight.  The  sky  is 

sometimes defined as the denser gaseous zone of a planet's atmosphere. 

At  night  the  sky  has  the  appearance  of  a  black  surface  or  region 

scattered with stars. 

18.  

QUYOSH- SUN 



The  Sun is  the star  at  the center  of  the  Solar  System. It  is  almost 

perfectly spherical and consists of hot plasma interwoven with magnetic 

fields. It has a diameter of about 1,392,000 km, about 109 times that of 

Earth,  and  its  mass  (about  2×1030  kilograms,  330,000  times  that  of 

Earth) accounts for about 99.86% of the total mass of the Solar System. 

Chemically, about three quarters of the Sun's mass consists of hydrogen, 




 

75 


while  the  rest  is  mostly  helium.  Less  than  2%  consists  of  heavier 

elements, including oxygen, carbon, neon, iron, and others. 

19.  

ATOM- ATOMS 



Atomic  spectroscopy  was  the  first  application  of  spectroscopy 

developed. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and atomic emission 

spectroscopy  (AES)  involve  visible  and  ultraviolet  light.  These 

absorptions and emissions, often referred to as atomic spectral lines, are 

due to electronic transitions of an outer shell electron to an excited state. 

Atoms  also  have  distinct  x-ray  spectra  that  are  attributable  to  the 

excitation of inner shell electrons to excited states. 

Atoms  of  different  elements  have  distinct  spectra  and  therefore 

atomic  spectroscopy  allows  for  the  identification  and  quantitation  of  a 

sample's  elemental  composition.  Robert  Bunsen,  developer  of  the 

Bunsen  burner,  and  Gustav  Kirchhoff  discovered  new  elements  by 

observing  their  emission spectra. Atomic  absorption lines  are observed 

in  the  solar  spectrum  and  referred  to  as  Fraunhofer  lines  after  their 

discoverer. A comprehensive explanation of the hydrogen spectrum was 

an  early  success  of  quantum  mechanics  and  explaining  the  Lamb  shift 

observed in the hydrogen spectrum led to the development of quantum 

electrodynamics. 

20.  


YER- THE EARTH 

Earth (or the Earth) is the third planet from the Sun and the densest 

and  fifth-largest  of  the  eight  planets  in  the  Solar  System.  It  is  also  the 

largest  of  the  Solar  System's  four  terrestrial  planets.  It  is  sometimes 

referred to as the World, the Blue Planet,[ or by its Latin name, Terra. 

Home  to  millions  of species  including  humans, Earth  is  currently 

the  only  astronomical  body  where  life  is  known  to  exist.  The  planet 

formed  4.54  billion  years  ago,  and  life  appeared  on  its  surface  within 

one  billion  years.Earth's  biosphere  has  significantly  altered  the 

atmosphere  and  other  abiotic  conditions  on  the  planet,  enabling  the 

proliferation of aerobic organisms as well as the formation of the ozone 

layer  which,  together  with  Earth's  magnetic  field, blocks  harmful  solar 

radiation, permitting  life  on land. The  physical  properties  of  the  Earth, 

as  well  as  its  geological  history  and  orbit,  have  allowed  life  to  persist 

during this period. The planet is expected to continue supporting life for 

at least another 500 million years. 

21.  

KOINOT- THE UNIVERSE 



everything that exists, including all physical matter and energy, the 

planets, stars, galaxies, and the contents of intergalactic space, although 

this usage may differ with the context (see definitions, below). The term 

universe  may  be  used  in  slightly  different  contextual  senses,  denoting 

such  concepts  as  the  cosmos,  the  world,  or  nature.  Observations  of 

earlier stages in the development of the  universe, which can be seen at 

great distances, suggest that the universe has been governed by the same 



 

76 


physical laws and constants throughout most of its extent and history. 

22.  


TEMPERATURA- TEMPERATURE 

Temperature  is  a  physical  property  of  matter  that  quantitatively 

expresses  the  common  notions  of  hot  and  cold.  Objects  of  low 

temperature  are  cold,  while  various  degrees  of  higher  temperatures  are 

referred to as warm or hot. Quantitatively, temperature is measured with 

thermometers,  which  may  be  calibrated  to  a  variety  of  temperature 

scales. 

Much  of  the  world  uses  the  Celsius  scale  (°C)  for  most 

temperature  measurements.  It  has  the  same  incremental  scaling  as  the 

Kelvin  scale  used  by  scientists,  but  fixes  its  null  point,  at  0°C  = 

273.15K,  the  freezing  point  of  water.[note  1]  A  few  countries,  most 

notably  the  United  States,  use  the  Fahrenheit  scale  for  common 

purposes, a historical scale on which water freezes at 32 °F and boils at 

212 °F. 


For  practical  purposes  of  scientific  temperature  measurement, the 

International  System  of  Units  (SI)  defines  a  scale  and  unit  for  the 

thermodynamic  temperature  by  using  the  easily  reproducible 

temperature of the triple point of water as a second reference point. For 

historical  reasons,  the  triple  point  is  fixed  at  273.16  units  of  the 

measurement  increment,  which  has  been  named  the  kelvin  in  honor  of 

the Scottish physicist who first defined the scale. The unit symbol of the 

kelvin is K. 

23.  

QORA JISM- A BLACK BODY 



A  black  body  is  an  idealized  physical  body  that  absorbs  all 

incident  electromagnetic  radiation.  Because  of  this  perfect  absorptivity 

at  all  wavelengths,  a  black  body  is  also  the  best  possible  emitter  of 

thermal  radiation,  which  it  radiates  incandescently  in  a  characteristic, 

continuous spectrum that depends on the body's temperature. At Earth-

ambient  temperatures  this  emission  is  in  the  infrared  region  of  the 

electromagnetic  spectrum  and  is  not  visible.  The  object  appears  black, 

since it does not reflect or emit any visible light. 

24.  

MASSA- WEIGHT 



In  most  physics  textbooks,  weight  is  the  name  given  to  the  force 

on  an  object  due  to  gravity.  However,  some  books  use  an  operational 

definition, defining the weight of an object as the force measured by the 

operation of weighing it (that is, the force required to support it). Both 

definitions imply that weight is a force and that its value depends on the 

local  gravitational  field.  For  example,  an  object  with  a  mass  of  one 

kilogram will have a weight of 9.8 newtons on the surface of the Earth, 

about one-sixth as much on the Moon, and zero when floating freely far 

out  in  space  away  from  all  gravitational  influence.  The  differences 

between  the  two  definitions  are  discussed  below.  For  example,  they 

differ over the weight of an object in free fall, such as a falling apple or 



 

77 


an  astronaut  in  an  orbiting  spacecraft.  In  these  cases,  the  operational 

definition  implies  the  weight  is  zero,  whereas  the  gravitational 

definition does not. 

25.  


MAGNIT MAYDON - MAGNETIC FIELD 

Magnetic field of a star is generated within regions of the interior 

where  convective  circulation  occurs.  This  movement  of  conductive 

plasma functions like a dynamo, generating magnetic fields that extend 

throughout  the  star.  The  strength  of  the  magnetic  field  varies  with  the 

mass  and  composition  of  the  star,  and  the  amount  of  magnetic  surface 

activity  depends  upon  the  star's  rate  of  rotation.  This  surface  activity 

produces  starspots,  which  are  regions  of  strong  magnetic  fields  and 

lower  than  normal  surface  temperatures.  Coronal  loops  are  arching 

magnetic  fields  that  reach  out  into  the  corona  from  active  regions. 

Stellar flares are bursts of high-energy particles that are emitted due to 

the same magnetic activity. 

26.  

TELESKOP- TELESCOPE 



A telescope is an instrument that aids in the observation of remote 

objects  by  collecting  electromagnetic  radiation  (such  as  visible  light). 

The first known practical telescopes were invented in the Netherlands at 

the  beginning  of  the  17th  century.  The  word  telescope  can  refer  to  a 

wide  range  of  instruments  detecting  different  regions  of  the 

electromagnetic spectrum. 

The  word  "telescope"  (from  the  Greek  τῆλε,  tele  "far"  and 

σκοπεῖν, skopein "to look or see"; τηλεσκόπος, teleskopos "far-seeing") 

was coined in 1611 by the Greek mathematician Giovanni Demisiani for 

one  of  Galileo  Galilei's  instruments  presented  at  a  banquet  at  the 

Accademia  dei  Lincei.  In  the  Starry  Messenger  Galileo  had  used  the 

term "perspicillum". 

27.  

ORBITA- ORBIT 



In physics, an orbit is the gravitationally curved path of an object 

around  a  point  in  space,  for  example  the  orbit  of  a  planet  around  the 

center  of  a  star  system,  such  as  the  solar  system.  Orbits  of  planets  are 

typically elliptical. 

Current understanding of the mechanics of orbital motion is based 

on  Albert  Einstein's  general  theory  of  relativity,  which  accounts  for 

gravity  as  due  to  curvature  of  space-time,  with  orbits  following 

geodesics;  though  in  common  practice  an  approximate  force-based 

theory of universal gravitation based on Kepler's laws of planetary mot 

28.  


RADIUS- RADIUS 

Remote  Authentication  Dial  In  User  Service  (RADIUS)  is  a 

networking  protocol  that  provides  centralized  Authentication, 

Authorization,  and  Accounting  (AAA)  management  for  computers  to 

connect  and  use  a  network  service.  RADIUS  was  developed  by 

Livingston Enterprises, Inc., in 1991 as an access server authentication 




 

78 


and accounting protocol and later brought into the Internet Engineering 

Task Force (IETF) standards. 

Because  of  the  broad  support  and  the  ubiquitous  nature  of  the 

RADIUS  protocol,  it  is  often  used  by  ISPs  and  enterprises  to  manage 

access  to  the  Internet  or  internal  networks,  wireless  networks,  and 

integrated  e-mail  services.  These  networks  may  incorporate  modems, 

DSL, access points, VPNs, network ports, web servers, etc. 

29.  


TORTISHISH-GRAVITATION  

Gravitation  is  a  natural  phenomenon  by  which  physical  bodies 

attract  with  a  force  proportional  to  their  mass.  In  everyday  life, 

gravitation is most familiar as the agent that gives weight to objects with 

mass  and  causes  them  to  fall  to  the  ground  when  dropped.  Gravitation 

causes  dispersed  matter  to  coalesce,  and  coalesced  matter  to  remain 

intact, thus accounting for the existence of the Earth, the Sun, and most 

of the macroscopic objects in the universe. Gravitation is responsible for 

keeping  the  Earth  and  the  other  planets  in  their  orbits  around  the  Sun; 

for keeping the Moon in its orbit around the Earth; for the formation of 

tides;  for  natural  convection,  by  which  fluid  flow  occurs  under  the 

influence  of  a  density  gradient  and  gravity;  for  heating  the  interiors  of 

forming  stars  and  planets  to  very  high  temperatures;  and  for  various 

other phenomena observed on Earth. 

30.  

AERODINAMIK KUCH-AERODYNAMIC FORCE 



Aerodynamic force is the resultant force exerted on a body by the air 

(or  some  other  gas)  in  which  the  body  is  immersed,  and  is  due  to  the 

relative  motion  between  the  body  and  the  fluid. An  aerodynamic  force 

arises from two causes:  

the force due to the pressure on the surface of the body 

the force due to viscosity, also known as skin friction 

When  a  body  is  exposed  to  the  wind  it  experiences  a  force  in  the 

direction  in  which  the  wind  is  moving.  This  is  an  aerodynamic  force. 

When a body is moving in air or some other gas the aerodynamic force 

is usually called drag. 

31.  

BOSIM KUCHI-PRESSURE-GRADIENT FORCE 



The  pressure  gradient  force  is  not  actually  a  'force'  but  the 

acceleration of air due to pressure difference (a force per unit mass). It 

is  usually  responsible  for  accelerating  a  parcel  of  air  from  a  high 

atmospheric pressure region to a low pressure region, resulting in wind. 

In  meteorology,  pressure  gradient  force  refers  to  the  horizontal 

movement of air according to the equation 

The term F / m is equal to the acceleration dv / dt because this is an 

expression  of  Newton's  law  F  =  ma.  dp  /  dx  is  the  component  of  the 

pressure  gradient  along  the  x-axis.  ρ  is  the  mass  density  and  (1  /  ρ) 

shows  that  as  the  mass  density  increases,  the  acceleration  due  to  the 

pressure gradient becomes smaller. 



 

79 


32.  

MAGNIT KUCHLARI-FORCE BETWEEN MAGNETS 

Magnets exert forces and torques on each other due to the complex 

rules  of  electromagnetism.  The  magnetic  field  of  magnets  are  due  to 

microscopic  currents  of  electrically  charged  electrons  orbiting  nuclei 

and the intrinsic magnetism of fundamental particles (such as electrons) 

that make up the material. Both of these are modeled quite well as tiny 

loops  of  current  called  magnetic  dipoles  that  produce  their  own 

magnetic  field  and  are  affected  by  external  magnetic  fields.  The  most 

elementary  force  between  magnets,  therefore,  is  the  magnetic  dipole-

dipole  interaction.  If  all  of  the  magnetic  dipoles  that  make  up  two 

magnets  are  known  then  the  net  force  on  both  magnets  can  be 

determined by summing up all these interaction between the dipoles of 

the first magnet and that of the second. 

It is often more convenient to model the force between two magnets 

as being due to forces between magnetic poles having magnetic charges 

'smeared' over them. Such a model fails to account for many important 

properties  of  magnetism  such  as  the  relationship  between  angular 

momentum  and  magnetic  dipoles.  Further,  magnetic  charge  does  not 

exist.  This  model  works  quite  well,  though,  in  predicting  the  forces 

between  simple  magnets  where  good  models  of  how  the  'magnetic 

charge' is distributed is available. 

33.  

KOSMIK FAZO-SPACE PHASE 



n  mathematics  and  physics,  a  phase  space,  introduced  by  Willard 

Gibbs in 1901,[1] is a space in which all possible states of a system are 

represented, with each possible state of the system corresponding to one 

unique  point  in  the  phase  space.  For  mechanical  systems,  the  phase 

space usually consists of all possible values of position and momentum 

variables. 

A plot of position and momentum variables as a function of time is 

sometimes  called  a  phase  plot  or  a  phase  diagram.  Phase  diagram, 

however, is more usually reserved in the physical sciences for a diagram 

showing the various regions of stability of the thermodynamic phases of 

a  chemical  system,  which  consists  of  pressure,  temperature,  and 

composition. 

34.  

ENERGIYA INTEGRALI- INTEGRAL OF ENERGY 



Integral Energy is the second largest state-owned energy corporation 

in  New  South  Wales,  incorporated  under  the  Energy  Services 

Corporations Act 1995 from a merger between Prospect Electricity and 

Illawarra  Electricity.  Integral  Energy  is  involved  in  electricity  retail  in 

addition  to  owning  an  electricity  distribution  network  and  currently 

holds licences to retail electricity in the contestable markets covered by 

the NEM (National Electricity Market). 

Integral  Energy  distributes  and  retails  electricity  and  services  to 

807,000 customers, or 2.1 million people. The company is increasingly 



 

80 


operating  outside  of  New  South  Wales,  with  the  introduction  of  full 

retail  contestability  in  other  states.  In  addition  to  electricity  retailing, 

Integral  Energy  also  owns  an  electricity  distribution  network  spanning 

24,500 square kilometres in Greater Western Sydney, the Illawarra, and 

the Southern Highlands. 

35.  


IKKI JISM MASALASI- TWO-BODY PROBLEM 

determine  the  motion  of  two  point  particles  that  interact  only  with 

each  other.  Common  examples  include  a  satellite  orbiting  a  planet,  a 

planet orbiting a star, two stars orbiting each other (a binary star), and a 

classical  electron  orbiting  an  atomic  nucleus  (although  to  solve  this 

system correctly a quantum mechanical approach must be used). 

The  two-body  problem  can  be  re-formulated  as  two  independent 

one-body  problems,  a  trivial  one  and  one  that  involves  solving  for  the 

motion  of  one  particle  in  an  external  potential.  Since  many  one-body 

problems  can  be  solved  exactly,  the  corresponding  two-body  problem 

can  also  be  solved.  By  contrast,  the  three-body  problem  (and,  more 

generally,  the  n-body  problem  for  n  ≥  3)  cannot  be  solved,  except  in 

special cases. 

36.  


AYLANISH  DAVRI-  THE  ROTATION  PERIOD  of  an 

astronomical  object  is  the  time  it  takes  to  complete  one  revolution 

around  its  axis  of  rotation  relative  to  the  background  stars.  It  differs 

from  the  planet's  solar  day,  which  includes  an  extra  fractional  rotation 

needed to accommodate the portion of the planet's orbital period during 

one day. 

37.  

GIPERBOLIK TROEKTORIYA- HYPERBOLIC TRAJECTORY 



In astrodynamics or celestial mechanics a hyperbolic trajectory is a 

Kepler  orbit  with  the  eccentricity  greater  than  1.  Under  standard 

assumptions a body traveling along this trajectory will coast to infinity, 

arriving  there  with  hyperbolic  excess  velocity  relative  to  the  central 

body.  Similarly  to  parabolic  trajectory  all  hyperbolic  trajectories  are 

also  escape  trajectories.  The  specific  energy  of  a  hyperbolic  trajectory 

orbit is positive. 

38.  


ORBITA ELEMENTLARI- ORBITAL ELEMENTS 

A  Kepler  orbit  is  specified  by  six  orbital  elements,  normally  the 

following  (assuming  an  elliptical  orbit;  parabolas  and  hyperbolas  are 

also possible if eccentricity >= 1). 

Two define the shape and size of the ellipse: 

Eccentricity ( ) 

Semimajor axis ( ) 

Two define the orientation of the orbital plane: 

Inclination ( ) 

Longitude of the ascending node ( ) 

And finally: 

Argument  of  periapsis  ( )  defines  the  orientation  of  the  ellipse  in 




 

81 


the orbital plane. 

Mean  anomaly  at  epoch    (

)  defines  the  position  of  the  orbiting 

body  along  the  ellipse.  (True  anomaly  ( )  is  shown  on  the  diagram, 

since mean anomaly does not represent a real geometric angle.)  

39.  


HARAKAT-ROTATION 

A three-dimensional object rotates always around an imaginary line 

called a rotation axis.If the axis is within the body, and passes through 

its  center  of  mass  the  body  is  said  to  rotate  upon  itself,  or  spin.  A 

rotation about an external point, e.g. the Earth about the Sun, is called a 

revolution  or  orbital  revolution,  typically  when  it  is  produced  by 

gravity. 

40.  


HARAKAT DINAMIKASI-FLIGHT DYNAMICS 

Flight dynamics is the science of air vehicle orientation and control 

in  three  dimensions.  The  three  critical  flight  dynamics  parameters  are 

the  angles  of  rotation  in  three  dimensions  about  the  vehicle's  center  of 

mass,  known  as  pitch,  roll  and  yaw  (quite  different  from  their  use  as 

Tait-Bryan angles). 

41.  

ENERGIYA-ENERGY 



In  physics,  energy  (Ancient  Greek:  ένέργεια  energeia  "activity, 

operation"[1])  is  an indirectly  observed quantity. It is  often understood 

as  the  ability  a  physical  system  has  to  do  work  on  other  physical 

systems.[2][3] Since work is defined as a force acting through a distance 

(a  length  of  space),  energy  is  always  equivalent  to  the  ability  to  exert 

pulls  or  pushes  against  the  basic  forces  of  nature,  along  a  path  of  a 

certain length. 

42.   ZARRA OQIMI- PARTICLE BEAMS 

Electron beams are used in welding, which allows energy densities up to 

107 W·cm−2 across a narrow focus diameter of 0.1–1.3 mm and usually 

does  not  require  a  filler  material.  This  welding  technique  must  be 

performed in a vacuum, so that the electron beam does not interact with 

the gas prior to reaching the target, and it can be used to join conductive 

materials that would otherwise be considered unsuitable for welding.  

Electron  beam  lithography  (EBL)  is  a  method  of  etching 

semiconductors  at  resolutions  smaller  than  a  micron.  This  technique  is 

limited by high costs, slow performance, the need to operate the beam in 

the  vacuum  and  the  tendency  of  the  electrons  to  scatter  in  solids.  The 

last problem limits the resolution to about 10 nm. For this reason, EBL 

is  primarily  used  for  the  production  of  small  numbers  of  specialized 

integrated circuits 

43.  


MAGNIT MAYDON - MAGNETIC FIELD 

magnetic field of a star is generated within regions of the interior 

where  convective  circulation  occurs.  This  movement  of  conductive 

plasma functions like a dynamo, generating magnetic fields that extend 

throughout  the  star.  The  strength  of  the  magnetic  field  varies  with  the 



 

82 


mass  and  composition  of  the  star,  and  the  amount  of  magnetic  surface 

activity  depends  upon  the  star's  rate  of  rotation.  This  surface  activity 

produces  starspots,  which  are  regions  of  strong  magnetic  fields  and 

lower  than  normal  surface  temperatures.  Coronal  loops  are  arching 

magnetic  fields  that  reach  out  into  the  corona  from  active  regions. 

Stellar flares are bursts of high-energy particles that are emitted due to 

the same magnetic activity. 

44.  


TELESKOP- TELESCOPE 

A telescope is an instrument that aids in the observation of remote 

objects  by  collecting  electromagnetic  radiation  (such  as  visible  light). 

The first known practical telescopes were invented in the Netherlands at 

the  beginning  of  the  17th  century.  The  word  telescope  can  refer  to  a 

wide  range  of  instruments  detecting  different  regions  of  the 

electromagnetic spectrum. 

The  word  "telescope"  (from  the  Greek  τῆλε,  tele  "far"  and 

σκοπεῖν, skopein "to look or see"; τηλεσκόπος, teleskopos "far-seeing") 

was coined in 1611 by the Greek mathematician Giovanni Demisiani for 

one  of  Galileo  Galilei's  instruments  presented  at  a  banquet  at  the 

Accademia  dei  Lincei.  In  the  Starry  Messenger  Galileo  had  used  the 

term "perspicillum". 

45.  


RADIO TELESKOP - RADIO TELESCOPES 

Nançay  Radioheliographe  is  an  interferometer  composed  of  48 

antennas 

observing 

at 

meter-decimeter 



wavelengths. 

The 


radioheliographe is installed at the Nançay Radio Observatory (France).  

Owens  Valley  Solar  Array  is  a  radio  interferometer  operated  by 

New  Jersey  Institute  of  Technology  consisting  of  7  antenas  observing 

from 1 to 18 GHz in both left and right circular polarization. OVSA is 

located  in  Owens  Valley,  California,  (USA),  now  is  under  reform, 

increasing to 15 the total number of  antennas and upgrading its control 

system.  

46.  


KOSMIK TELESKOP - SPACE TELESCOPES 

Space Telescopes 

The  following  spacecraft  missions  have  flares  as  their  main 

observation target. 

Yohkoh - The Yohkoh (originally Solar A) spacecraft observed the 

Sun with a variety of instruments from its launch in 1991 until its failure 

in 2001. The observations spanned a period from one solar maximum to 

the  next. Two instruments of  particular  use  for  flare  observations  were 

the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT), a glancing incidence low energy X-ray 

telescope  for  photon  energies  of  order  1  keV,  and  the  Hard  X-ray 

Telescope  (HXT),  a  collimation  counting  instrument  which  produced 

images in higher energy X-rays (15-92 keV) by image synthesis.  

47.  

YULDUZ ATMOSFERASI - STELLAR ATMOSPHERE 



The stellar atmosphere is the outer region of the volume of a  star, 


 

83 


lying  above  the  stellar  core,  radiation  zone  and  convection  zone.  It  is 

divided into several regions of distinct character: 

The  photosphere,  which  is  the  atmosphere's  lowest  and  coolest 

layer is normally its only visible part. Light escaping from the surface of 

the star stems from this region and passes through the higher layers. The 

Sun's  photosphere  has  a  temperature  in  the  5,770 K  to  5,780 K  range. 

Starspots,  cool  regions  of  disrupted  magnetic  field  lie  on  the 

photosphere.  

Above  the  photosphere  lies  the  chromosphere.  This  part  of  the 

atmosphere first cools down and then starts to heat up to about 10 times 

the temperature of the photosphere.  

Above  the  chromosphere  lies  the  transition  region,  where  the 

temperature increases rapidly on a distance of only around 100 km.   

48.  


NURIY TEZLIK- LIGHT SPEED 

The  speed  of  light  (meaning  speed  of  light  in  vacuum),  usually 

denoted by c, is a physical constant important in many areas of physics. 

Its value is 299,792,458  metres  per  second, a  figure  that  is  exact  since 

the  length  of  the  metre  is  defined  from  this  constant  and  the 

international  standard  for  time.  This  speed  is  approximately  186,282 

miles per second. It is the maximum speed at which all energy, matter, 

and information in the universe can travel. It is the speed of all massless 

particles  and  associated  fields—including  electromagnetic  radiation 

such as light—in vacuum, and it is predicted by the current theory to be 

the  speed  of  gravity  (that  is,  gravitational  waves).  Such  particles  and 

waves  travel  at  c  regardless  of  the  motion  of  the  source  or  the  inertial 

frame  of  reference  of  the  observer.  In  the  theory  of  relativity,  c 

interrelates  space  and  time,  and  appears  in  the  famous  equation  of 

mass–energy equivalence E = mc2. 

49.  


KIMYOVIY TARKIBI- CHEMICAL COMPOSITION 

In astronomy and physical cosmology, the metallicity of an object 

is the proportion of its matter made up of chemical elements other than 

hydrogen  and  helium.  Since  stars,  which  comprise  most  of  the  visible 

matter  in  the  universe,  are  composed  mostly  of  hydrogen  and  helium, 

astronomers use for convenience the blanket term "metal" to describe all 

other  elements  collectively.  Thus,  a  nebula  rich  in  carbon,  nitrogen, 

oxygen,  and  neon  would  be  "metal-rich"  in  astrophysical  terms  even 

though  those  elements  are  non-metals  in  chemistry.  This  term  should 

not be confused with the usual definition of "metal"; metallic bonds are 

impossible within stars, and the very strongest chemical bonds are only 

possible  in  the  outer  layers  of  cool  K  and  M  stars.  Normal  chemistry 

therefore has little or no relevance in stellar interiors.  

50.  


MASSIV YULDUZ - MASSIVE STARS 

During their helium-burning phase, very high mass stars with more 

than nine solar masses expand to form red supergiants. Once this fuel is 



 

84 


exhausted  at  the  core,  they  can  continue  to  fuse  elements  heavier  than 

helium. 


The core contracts until the temperature and pressure are sufficient 

to  fuse  carbon  (see  carbon  burning  process).  This  process  continues, 

with  the  successive  stages  being  fueled  by  neon  (see  neon  burning 

process), oxygen (see oxygen burning process), and silicon (see silicon 

burning process).  

 

 



Download 0.75 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©hozir.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling

    Bosh sahifa
davlat universiteti
ta’lim vazirligi
O’zbekiston respublikasi
maxsus ta’lim
zbekiston respublikasi
davlat pedagogika
o’rta maxsus
axborot texnologiyalari
nomidagi toshkent
pedagogika instituti
texnologiyalari universiteti
navoiy nomidagi
samarqand davlat
ta’limi vazirligi
toshkent axborot
nomidagi samarqand
guruh talabasi
toshkent davlat
haqida tushuncha
Darsning maqsadi
xorazmiy nomidagi
vazirligi toshkent
Toshkent davlat
tashkil etish
Alisher navoiy
Ўзбекистон республикаси
rivojlantirish vazirligi
pedagogika universiteti
matematika fakulteti
sinflar uchun
Nizomiy nomidagi
таълим вазирлиги
tibbiyot akademiyasi
maxsus ta'lim
ta'lim vazirligi
bilan ishlash
махсус таълим
o’rta ta’lim
fanlar fakulteti
Referat mavzu
Navoiy davlat
haqida umumiy
umumiy o’rta
fanining predmeti
Buxoro davlat
fizika matematika
malakasini oshirish
universiteti fizika
kommunikatsiyalarini rivojlantirish
jizzax davlat
tabiiy fanlar