Necrocurse interview for Grinder Magazine, Chile/Spain



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NECROCURSE
Interview for Grinder Magazine, Chile/Spain
www.grindermagazine.cl

Answered by Nicklas “Terror” Rudolfsson 2013-01-05


To start, tell us about your new album “Grip of The Dead”.  What this release represent to you guys?
It's our first full length album. It feels really good that it is finally released. The plan was first to record and release it in 2011, but in a way it was good that there were delays. Then we could scrap a few songs that did not feel quite well and write new ones that were better and work more on the material in general. But we're certainly satisfied with the album, despite tight budgets and recordings in several short sessions in different studios.

Speaking about your new record. How satisfied do you feel about it? What’s new in these songs? Was it difficult to finally arrange, write and
finish all these songs?
We like the album. Feels like it's a balanced yet varied selection of songs that are included. The material is written in 2010-2012. Most often we work so that any of us writes the foundation for a song. Then, we work jointly with it in rehearsal until everything is in place. Some songs are easy to write and arrange and some take longer. The important thing is that the end result must be hard as hell.
It calls my attention that you guys, all experienced musicians with other bands (each one with several records in their backs) have chosen the legendary Andy LaRoque to work with. I do respect King Diamond and mostly LaRoque’s CV on music, but his style is quite different from what you guys play. I guess it was a big challenge for both you guys and him. Explain me the reasons to work with him?  Moreover, how was the process to work with this legendary guitar player? Have you ever worked with him before? Is NECROCURSE his first incursion into the really evil-obscure Speed/Death sound?
I have worked with Andy many times to and from over the years. He's a damn good person to work with in the studio. For Necrocurse we recorded the drums in Sonic Train Studios with Andy. Then we came back and mixed and mastered the album. We think that he made a huge great job with the mix. He fixed exactly the sound we wanted. He is used to record more extreme metal too so it's no problem.

Songs like “The Devil Cobra” or “Infernal Rebellion” proves NECROCURSE is also way influenced by Heavy Metal. Tell us your main influences in this record.
Hard to say what influences we have. But probably it's the music that we ourselves grew up with and still listen to. It would be strange otherwise if you are not affected at all by what you like to listen to. But to say a few other bands, it's everything from Judas Priest, Iron Maiden, Saxon, Sortilège, Motörhead ... to Venom, Bathory, Slayer, Mercyful Fate, Possessed, Coroner ... to Sarcofágo, Grotesque, Morbid Angel, Vulcano and so on ...

With Hellbutcher as vocalist, did you guys were afraid that the final sound of this record wasn’t that close to the NIFELHEIM’s obscure atmosphere? I mean the whole idea of NECROCURSE is to start a new band.

Terror: It would be strange if it were not a few parallels since sings in both bands. And he partly also write material for NECROCURSE. But it would be pointless if we sounded like Nifelheim but we do not think we do. NECROCURSE hopefully have a little unique style to our sound.

In few months the weather is going to change in Europe. Summer time is coming! Are you planning to play more often than the usual? I guess you may have several festival appearances confirmed already? Any big tour or something like that?
Currently we have only a few gigs booked. But we will make sure to book a few more during the year. We have many other things besides the band also this summer but of course we will have time for some festivals.
Pulverised Records  is proving  they have a serious commitment with the Swedish extreme scene. Tell us why you guys have chosen to work with them? (I mean, a label from Singapore!!!)  I´m quite sure the big jungle of european labels (N.Blast, C.Media, Earache) showed lots of interest on you guys.. Tell me what was going on in these matters. Are you guys willing to keep working with Pulverised?
We have previously heard good about Pulverised and we chose them because it was a simple contract without mass twisty shit. But we have just signed for one album. Right now we have not even thought about how the next album will be planned record company wise. So far we are very pleased with Pulverised Records.

What about a North American release and why not, South American release of this album? Have you guys discussed this idea? What kind of plans do you have in this matters?


It is primarily up to Pulverised. But of course, we want as a band to have our music out to everyone who likes us. We have a preference for different editions as vinyl and cassette too.
Blood Harvest has gained a very good reputation in the vinyl UG front. I´m glad that NECROCURSE decided to work with them. They released  great records lately, even from Chilean bands such as GODLESS, HADES ARCHER or MAGNANIMVS. Have you been able to heard them?  Anyway, is the LP version going to be very different from the CD? Different artwork or something like that? Tell us some details!
So offhand I can not say I heard the bands you mention. But vinyl album will be released by Blood Harvest and To The Death Records together. It will be the same cover but the layout is a little different. A part of the release will be very limited with a little extra "accessories". An old bonus track will also be involved, "Souls of a Thousand Funerals" (re-recorded).

What started as a side band like NECROCURSE used to be in the early days, has ended being a very interesting challenge for you guys.  Did you guys expected that?
Terror: Actually, there was no plan from the beginning. It has just emerged, and in 2009 it became more serious and a very active band. We are told that a real band now so there is absolutely no side project.

How serious are you guys taking NECROCURSE in your life? It is just going to be a couple of funny years only or are you willing to conquer the entire UG scene with your evil sound?
Terror: We take the band seriously, and as I said, we are an active band. Then we all more or less have other activities on the side so it'll be no talk of any major world tours. But since we are pretty "underground" there will be no big tours anyway. As it looks now, we will drive on to write new music and record more albums. Of course we will play more live also.
Tell us the main lineup changes that NECROCURSE has experienced since his creation. The current lineup is quite different from the original one? Please, tell us some details.

The first real official lineup became official in 2009 and consisted of Rotting Vomitor (guitar), Basstard (bass), Terror (drums & session vocals). Then Hellbutcher (vocals) joined in 2010 and Mörda (guitar) joined short after that.

Regarding the sound of the band, do you thing that it is original? What you look for when you sit down and write music?

It is difficult to be completely innovative and original. But of course want and we try to have our own NECROCURSE sound as good as possible. Our aim is certainly not to being retro in any way. We play the music we like and try to do it in a reasonably own way. Bands that are clones of others are just boring. Then you might as well play covers.
Tell me about the main influences you have inside the band.
In part, I think I answered this before but it's everything from heavy metal to speed/thrash and death/black metal. Since we are between 37-45 years old we are obviously very much into metal music that we have grown up with.

Is digital world an enemy to the music?, especially extreme music? Why?

I do not know if it's an advantage or disadvantage. Everything has its positive and negative sides. Sure you can miss underground scene that was in the 80's and 90's. But the Internet and the digital is good in its own way in terms of quick distribution of music.
Do you think extreme music or Death Metal should go towards endless evolution or it should just stay as it is?

Have no idea. He who lives will see. We continue to play what we want until it runs out.
Is Metal limited? In your opinion, what is the purpose in Metal music?

For me personally, I do not think metal evolved for the better over the past 15 years. But perhaps no such younger feel. So it is clearly subjective. Nothing I think about at all.
Some people think this music should be always underground, away from commercial media or mainstream. Do you agree? Why?

Most often it usually go downhill when it gets too commercialized. Much of the best actually comes from underground periods in the bands and musicians so-called career.
I have been trying to reach out to as many people as I can in order to get this book that I´m working on (UNDERGROUND NEVER DIES!). Well on its way.  I am  asking the key-characters of this movement, “What is this “underground” concept all about? What does it really mean to you.” After having read some of the responses that I have already received, I am truly impressed that a simple question can have such varied responses and impacts.  Far beyond how this word really started, the concept of Underground has been, and will continue to be an immortal entity which refuses to die. Can you explain that really the word “Underground” means to you?

Terror: In short we can say that for me is underground when the music is not made for a commercial market. When there is a genuine feeling behind the creation. And perhaps also that music is experienced "obscure" radio hit people.

I consider metal fanzines like the base of underground music. Many of them has been the source of information for all music followers (musicians, journalists, fans or label related business men, to name a few). Although Internet existence, this source of information has never abandoned the face of the music scene. So, at the beginning of your music journey, how important were the fanzines to you? Do you still keep an eye on them? Do you remember any memorable one that changed your way of think about music? or any particular one that you considered important/fundamental in the 80s?

Fanzines, homemade compilation tapes trading and demo trading was extremely important for 20-25 year ago. I myself remember how fun it was to sit and write letters and send cassettes. Then I received several letters a week with new demos. Not to mention all the cool flyers where I got tips about new bands and fanzines. The time had clearly its charm and excitement.
Fanzine was very important to keep up with what happened to all the bands and read the reviews of new demos.

In the 80s, Death Metal music began as something that no one dreamed would grow to have any validity whatsoever; it ended up being a groundbreaking thing. How do you see DM now? Do you believe that this kind of music can still grow and continue to be a menace to the mainstream?

Terror: I can admit that I do not have full control of everything that happens with the new band and the scene itself. But now and then you hear anything new band that sounds good. There will probably always be some form of movement that is struggling on with death metal.


Some people also say 90’ies was not a very good decade for extreme music. You have been playing the entire 90ies. Why do you think that decade can be considered as an important one, such as the 80ties? Tell me your reasons!

Terror: Personally, I prefer the early 90's instead of the later. It feels like it lost something there. Although I myself had a good time with some bands back then.


After some important time in the music industry, we can see many things in a clearer way. What kind of positive and negative things could you recognize inside this business?

Have no direct good to say to this but the important thing is that you as a musician and band must make sure to do what you want and do not sell yourselves.
Why do you think music has been so important for some people? And especially to you?

No idea, it was just something I was very interested in when I was a kid, and it has only continued and will probably do so to the grave.
Lyrically speaking. How important are the lyrics for you? Are you trying to give any message to the audience?  Basically, what are you trying to say…..
For NECROCURSE it's pretty classic death metal type of lyrics used. We believe we have no official deep message to be delivered. Then if anyone interpret poetry in one's own way is quite another thing.

Any of you guys have ever played in South America before?  What about this kind of plans? What do yu know about the South American scene, especially the Chilean one….

Of course I have heard bands like Pentagram and others. But the only one of us who have been in the region of the world is probably Hellbutcher. We'll see if we will do some gigs there but I hope it becomes a reality.

What about the new styles in Death Metal, such as Slamming Death Metal? Or Gore Grind? Are you into that styles?

Slamming???? never heard off. Gore grind is Carcass style I assume? Some of the old Carcass stuff is still cool.
Where are the NECROCURSE headquarters? Do you guys live in the same town? Or rehearsal every week?

We are living in or near a town called Uddevalla on the west coast of Sweden. We have our own rehearsal place here where we both rehearse, record demos and parts of album recordings. We try to rehearse every week but it’s from time to time.
What about the DM bands  from your town or country? Anything interesting to say? I bet you could name us quite a few….

Here in Uddevalla I do not think that there are so many bands right now. There is a pretty good band called Vornth. For the rest of Sweden, there are certainly many bands that I do not know. But Grave is good hehe.
What are you listening now? Is anything outside metal that you may be proud of  mentioning?
I still listen to most of the old classics in metal genres like death / thrash / doom. Otherwise, it is currently not much more than that.

What is Death Metal for you? How important is in your life?

Of course it is important. Whatever you do, there is some kind of (death) metal every day.
What are you looking for in the music now?
Well, coming up with new good riffs!

Personal Info
To start, I’d like to know a little about your past. From where does your passion or interest for the music come? Could you blame any particular person for this?
Terror: My father (who is also a musician) and my uncle who introduced early hard rock in my life. I have played (or tried to play) instruments as long as I can remember.
Age of each band member? What you do in the daily basis? Work in any particular thing or do you live off these activities?
Terror: Do not remember the exact age but all are between 37-45. Since we play underground music so we do not live financially on the music. All are working more or less with job printing, IT, welding and so on.
You have played in many countries, visited hundreds of cities… So, there is any place or country that you would love to move and live for few years or even the rest of your life?
Terror: I like to stay in Sweden. But there are obviously other good countries like Norway also haha. I do not know if I would want to live in another country for a long time so it's hard to say. Sure, sometimes it's nice to be in a warmer country for a period as well but as I said, I feel comfortable in Sweden.
What do you like the most about your country?  And what do you hate about it.
Terror: Some good things are close to various natural areas, close to the sea, pretty good music scene in terms of venues. Less good, high taxes, which in many cases goes to the wrong things.
We all think that our time in the planet has some interesting purpose. A meaning. What is the point of your life? Why do you think you are here in this world?
Terror: This is something I never directly reflects on and this does not seem particularly interesting either.
When you exactly realized that music was going to be a important thing in your life?
Terror: I can not remember exactly but it was early in the young child years.
What kind of connection do you feel with this kind of music?
Terror: Hard to say, but clearly there is a strong connection when it is something that has existed for a long time and will be for a long time.
Have you bought any book Lp, or CD lately? Any fave site or record store that you always need to visit from time to time?
Terror: Almost all record stores seem to quickly disappear, at least in some small towns which is sad. Do not really know what that last one I bought was but know it was not as long as I bought one of the latest books from Koontz.
People from outside the movement may see us as total strangers, even like antisocial freaks. The thing is, how could you explain our (Metal heads) behavior or our way of think?
Terror: It is a kind of lifestyle. Have no better answer.
Do you ever consider yourself as a different person like feeling outside society?
Terror: Probably more in younger days. Now, I'm not think of it. In part, you learn or have to adapt some things well, but the metal is always there.
In retrospect, is there anything you’d change about your music career?
Terror: Perhaps we should start NECROCURSE much earlier than it did.

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